Is it Possible To Stop Snoring?

Yes! It is possible to stop snoring. If snoring is becoming a serious problem, then it’s time to do something about it.

It’s not easy to live with someone who snores. It could instantly take a toll on a relationship.

Snoring can be a big stress for your relationship. In a study more than 50% of couples admitted that snoring leads to serious arguments and is affecting their relationship. 80% of them said that sometimes they have to sleep in the other room for a sound sleep. Snoring affects your relationships as it is frustrating situation for both the partners. Since snoring disturbs your sleep it directly leads to situations that can diminish affection amongst the spouse.

(Via:https://www.onlymyhealth.com/how-snoring-affects-your-relationships-1303813482)

Snoring is a common problem for almost everybody. Although it’s widely believed that snoring affects older people more, both young and old are affected just the same.

Any person can snore. Frequently, people who do not regularly snore will report snoring after a viral illness, after drinking alcohol, or when taking some medications.

People who snore can have any body type. We frequently think of a large man with a thick neck as a snorer. However, a thin woman with a small neck can snore just as loudly. In general, as people get older and as they gain weight, snoring will worsen.

(Via:https://www.medicinenet.com/snoring/article.htm#how_common_is_snoring)

To understand why snoring affects almost everybody, one has to know what snoring is. Snoring happens when breathing is obstructed. Unfortunately, that can happen in a lot of ways. One way to obstruct breathing is by simply sleeping on the back.

Scientists say there are two types of snorers: those who snore only when they sleep on their backs, and those who do it regardless of their position. After sleep researchers in Israel examined more than 2,000 sleep apnea patients, for example, they found that 54 percent were “positional,” meaning they snored only when asleep on their backs. The rest were “nonpositional.”

(Via:https://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/19/health/19really.html)

Smoking and drinking alcohol can also cause one to snore. When it comes to smoking, it’s not just the smoker …

Stop Snoring With This One Easy Device

Men’s Journal covers how an oral appliance can reduce snoring.

The Zyppah Anti-Snoring MouthpieceOpens a New Window. ($100) is an FDA-cleared, self-molded, boil-and-bite oral appliance that is effective, safe, and easy to use. What makes Zyppah different is its patent-pending tongue strap that gently holds and stabilizes your tongue. The revolutionary Zyppah tongue strap holds the tongue in place, preventing it from falling back into the throat. Meanwhile, Mandibular Advancement moves the jaw forward. Working together, these two solutions open your airway during sleep, allowing you to breathe freely—and allowing the person next to you a night of peaceful, relaxing sleep.

Clinical studies have shown Zyppah to have a 91 percent effectiveness. Over 800 reviewers have tried Zyppah, and no one—that’s ZERO—reviewers have given the device less than four (out of five) stars.

Get the full story at www.mensjournal.com

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/04/stop-snoring/…

Why Clinicians May Miss Identifying Patients Who Could Benefit from Positional Sleep Apnea Therapies

Split-night studies that don’t necessarily allow patients the time to change postures and a lack of reliable reimbursement can lead to position-dependent sleep apnea being missed.

Clinicians face several obstacles in identifying positional sleep apnea (POSA), which can hinder their ability to treat the condition.

Positional sleep apnea can affect as many as 49.5% of patients with mild sleep apnea and 19.4% of those with moderate sleep apnea. In people of Asian decent, these numbers are higher with as many as 75% of all obstructive sleep apnea patients having a positional component.1 “Many physicians working in sleep medicine really underappreciate the prevalence overall of positional sleep apnea,” says Samuel Krachman, DO, a pulmonologist and professor of thoracic medicine and surgery at Temple University’s Lewis Katz School of Medicine.

Positional sleep apnea refers to sleep-breathing difficulties associated with the supine position, which promotes a downward gravitational pull and causes the muscles in the airways to fall straight back. While there is currently a plethora of devices on the market to help people keep off their backs when asleep, identifying positional sleep apnea is not always easy.

In recent years, third-party payors have become stricter in their criteria for who qualifies for an in-lab sleep test. And those who are approved for in-lab studies are often only approved for a split-night study (instead of a two-night study, when a patient is diagnosed one night and then titrated the second night). During split-night studies, patients might not have time to assume all positions, says Krachman.

According to research, published in the journal CHEST, positional sleep apnea cannot usually be properly assessed during a split-night study.2

“The biggest issue, in many cases, is how we diagnose patients in the United States leaves a gap in knowledge,” explains Daniel Levendowski, president and co-founder of Advanced Brain Monitoring, which produces the FDA-approved Night Shift positional sleep apnea therapy device.

“[Sleep technologists] only need two hours of sleep time to know whether to move that patient to CPAP and in that two-hour window it is very difficult to get a good

Here’s A Simple Cure For Snoring

There’s a cure for snoring. It’s as simple as wearing an oral device while sleeping. Oral devices or oral appliances can improve the airflow in the mouth by keeping the jaw forward. This, in turn, lessens the chances of snoring.

They push the tongue and jaw forward, which makes the airway larger and improves airflow. This also decreases the chance that tissue will collapse and narrow the airway when you breathe in. Examples include a mandibular repositioning device (MRD) or a tongue retaining device.

(Via:https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/health-topics/hw48677)

Oral devices are very simple and easy to wear. It can even be worn while talking and drinking some water. The best part is that they work quite well. It spares the snorer from undergoing surgery.

Opening the airway through surgery is no joke. Wearing a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask is also an alternative but it could be a hassle, considering it requires a machine.

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is a common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

A CPAP machine uses a hose and mask or nosepiece to deliver constant and steady air pressure.

Common problems with CPAP include a leaky mask, trouble falling asleep, stuffy nose and a dry mouth.

(Via:https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sleep-apnea/in-depth/cpap/art-20044164)

Wearing an oral device is a less painful alternative. Needless to say, it’s also a very convenient alternative. It just has to be worn while sleeping and that’s it.

These days, oral devices are worth considering. Contrary to what people think, oral devices do not actually cause jaw pain. As a matter of fact, wearing an oral device does more than just open the airway. It also prevents the teeth from grinding.

Teeth grinding and clenching are part of a condition called bruxism, which is a sleep-related movement disorder that can cause a variety of problems, such as tooth pain, jaw pain, and sore gums. It can also damage your teeth.

Wearing a mouthguard while your sleep can help keep your top and bottom teeth separated so they don’t damage each other from the pressure of grinding or clenching.

(Via:https://www.healthline.com/health/mouth-guard#types)

A good …

Zyppah Gets FDA Over-The-Counter 510k Nod Allowing It to Sell Its Anti-Snoring Oral Appliance via Third-Party Retail Marketplaces

After six years on the market, Zyppah has been granted US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearances to be made available over-the-counter (OTC) via third-party retail marketplaces.

“As a Class 2 medical device, which we were, you can sell it on your website directly to consumers BUT you cannot sell through a third party (such as Amazon or any retail store as in Costco, Target, WalMart, pharmacies, supermarkets, etc),” explains creator Jonathan Greenburg, DDS, via email to Sleep Review. “With the OTC approval, we can now sell everywhere in retail.”

As noted in the FDA #K182312, “The Zyppah Anti-Snoring Appliance is intended for use by adults (18 years or older) as an aid to reduce snoring. Biocompatibility testing results demonstrated that Zyppah is biocompatible under ISO 10993, including cytotoxicity, sensitization, and irritation testing. The device was shown to meet the requirements of the ISO 10993 guidelines for each of these tests. All materials used in the device are certified USP Class VI and used in many other currently marketed medical devices.”

Zyppah is a patented dual-action mouthpiece featuring both a mandible advancer and a “seat belt for the tongue” to keep the tongue from blocking the airway. NBA Hall of Famer Shaquille O’Neal serves as a global ambassador for the product. It retails for $99.95.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/04/zyppah-gets-fda-counter-510k-nod-allowing-sell-anti-snoring-oral-appliance-via-third-party-retail-marketplaces/…

Upcoming Movie, Ode to Joy, Featuring Narcolepsy with Cataplexy Portrayal

Today, Project Sleep issued the following public statement after receiving many questions from community members about the upcoming feature-length movie, Ode to Joy.

Project Sleep’s Public Statement: Narcolepsy Portrayal in Film, Ode to Joy

Los Angeles, CA, April 10, 2019 — Project Sleep would like to inform our supporters and the narcolepsy community that we are aware of Ode to Joy — an upcoming feature film depicting a main character portrayal of narcolepsy with cataplexy. The portrayal was inspired by a 2010 NPR This American Life segment titled “I’ve Fallen In Love and I Can’t Get Up.”

Project Sleep is committed to advancing our bold goals to increase the public’s knowledge of narcolepsy to 80% by 2025; reduce delays in proper diagnosis from 8-15 years to two years by 2030; and reduce stigma for those living with narcolepsy. We understand the primary goal of film is entertainment, while also recognizing the role entertainment plays in helping to shape societal perceptions of health conditions like narcolepsy. We have been in conversation with the producers over the past few months about possible opportunities to work together to raise awareness. We look forward to continuing this conversation with the film’s team and continuing to do everything we can to amplify the voices of people living with narcolepsy and their loved ones through our organization’s programming and public relations efforts. 

Sign up for our e-updates to be the first to know about important news and program announcements.


Friends, I look forward to updating you on this topic as soon as possible. Thank you for your support of this effort along with Project Sleep’s on-going proactive efforts to build a brighter future for all people with narcolepsy. Project Sleep’s programming includes: the Rising Voices fo Narcolepsy leadership training program, Narcolepsy: Not Alone campaign, Jack & Julie Narcolepsy Scholarship and our exciting new effort joining together 21 other organizations on six continents around the world to establish  World Narcolepsy Day for Sept. 22, 2019!!

from Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/upcoming-movie-ode-to-joy-featuring-narcolepsy-with-cataplexy-portrayal/…

Best Sleep Aids for Insomnia

insomnia

Do you have insomnia?

Chances are you’ve experienced insomnia symptoms more
often than you realize. In fact, take a look at the following questions.

  • Do you sometimes find it difficult to fall asleep?
  • Do you sometimes find yourself waking up throughout the night?
  • Do you sometimes wake up earlier than you meant to, and then find that you can’t get back to sleep?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above, then you
have experienced insomnia.

Insomnia is a common sleep disorder that affects just
about everyone at one point or another. Some people are lucky enough to only
experience sleep problems once or twice a month, or even just a few times a year.

For others, trying to get a good night’s sleep is a
constant, nightly struggle. In fact, it’s estimated that as many as 10% of
adults suffer from severe insomnia.

Some insomnia sufferers seem to think their sleeping
problems are just something they have to learn to live with. They might
consider taking sleeping pills, but this is a step many are reluctant to take.

Luckily, there are plenty of remedies for insomnia,
probably more than you ever imagined. And some of them are 100% natural.

Read on to find out how you can deal with your
insomnia. You’ll also learn what you can do if your child has trouble getting a
good night’s sleep.

Best Natural Sleep Aids

More and more, people are turning to natural remedies
for common ailments. And insomnia is no exception.

If you’re looking for a natural solution for your
sleeping problems, here are 5 good ones you can try.

Natural Sleep Aid #1.
Relaxation Exercises

As strange as it might sound, part of the reason you
can’t fall asleep might be that you haven’t learned to do it in the right way.

There are things you can do that will help you fall
asleep faster. Unfortunately, these techniques don’t come naturally to
everyone.

You might have heard one of the best ways to get a
good night’s sleep is to do relaxation or yoga exercises before bedtime. Or…

Warning: A Snoring Partner Shortens Your Life

Snoring causes troubles for couples. It’s not just the snorer who is in danger, so is the partner.

Sleeping with someone who snores puts you in real danger. This is not to scare you or anything but a snoring partner shortens your life.

It’s true that sleeping with a snorer can take a toll on your health. People who sleep next to snorers report high levels of fatigue and sleepiness and may even be at higher risk for hearing loss.

(Via:https://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/11/sleeping-with-a-snorer/)

What’s worse than waking up in the middle of the night because of a loud snore? It’s staying up against your will because you just can’t go back to sleep anymore. Who in the world can go back to sleep with such an annoying noise?

The blasting sound that goes right into your ear is more than just irritating. The truth is, it’s deafening for both you and the snorer. Yes, you and your snoring partner are both at risk of losing the sense of hearing. Here is the reason why:

Not all snores are created equal. The average snore is about 40 decibels, about the same level of noise you would hear in a library (think consistent whispering and quiet chattering).

Via:https://www.bustle.com/articles/76670-5-things-you-should-know-if-your-partner-snores-like-a-jackhammer-or-has-sleep-apnea)

If you’re a light sleeper, a whisper could easily wake and keep you up as well. After all, a noise is a noise. It doesn’t really matter how loud it is.

In a worst-case scenario, you could be sleeping with someone who snores very loud. That could be very bad for both you and your snoring partner.

But believe it or not: the human snore can roar. In fact, one of Britain’s loudest snorers is a grandmother of four who snores every night at 111.6 decibels. That’s louder than a jackhammer, a subway train, a hand drill, power mower, snowmobile, motorcycle, and a power saw—and just eight decibels lower than the sound produced by a low-flying jet plane.

Via:https://www.bustle.com/articles/76670-5-things-you-should-know-if-your-partner-snores-like-a-jackhammer-or-has-sleep-apnea)

Now, that’s loud. That could really damage your hearing.

Research shows that the internal vibration in the inner ear can

Why Nasal Breathing Is Best

Sleep physicians can identify and correct mouth breathing in their patients.

Sometimes we do not think about a disease until it becomes overwhelming. This is especially true when the symptoms are relatively mild, have an unclear origin, or a very gradual onset. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a good example of this sort of disease; people will often live with OSA symptoms for years before seeking medical attention.

It is important to identify risk factors for diseases like OSA; some will be causal factors, and they may be crucial to effective treatments and even cures. Obesity is probably the most well-known OSA risk factor, but others clearly exist, such as hypertension and smoking.

Less well recognized is how nasal obstruction is a risk factor for OSA. And unlike other contributors to OSA, nasal obstruction is often amenable to treatment. Even when not contributing to OSA, nasal congestion can worsen subjective sleep quality in our patients. What’s more, nasal obstruction can be a major challenge for the treatment of OSA, so it is important to recognize and manage it in all of sleep-disordered breathing patients.

In this article, I will discuss nasal obstruction as a risk factor for OSA, as a barrier to the treatment of OSA, and how sleep medicine specialists can best address it for OSA patients. By treating our patient’s nasal obstruction, we can improve their sleep, adherence to positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, and improve their quality of life.

Why Nasal Congestion Is Important

The nose performs several functions during breathing. It humidifies and warms the air and filters out large particles—protecting the lower airway. While we are all capable of oral breathing, the oral mucosa is not capable of an adequate amount of humidification. In fact, an easy way to determine if someone is mouth breathing in their sleep is to ask if their mouth is dry in the morning or if they need water at their bedside.

For patients with obstructive sleep apnea, especially those using positive airway pressure devices, nasal breathing is crucial. If there is complete or near-complete

Getting Your Child Out of Your Bed

When I was pregnant for the first time, I had visions of my husband, my baby, and I all sleeping peacefully in the same bed. All three of us, together and safe, as a family, straight through the night.

That lasted about a week before I realized that my baby didn’t know basic bed etiquette, like not kicking people in the face while they’re lying next to you, and not pulling mommy’s hair while she’s having a wonderful dream.

But once you’ve brought your baby into your bed, it can be extremely difficult to get them out. We’re creatures of habit when it comes to sleep, and change is never welcomed gracefully.

So today, I have a few tips to help you if you’ve decided to reclaim your bed and get your little one sleeping in their own room. It’s not going to be easy, I’ll warn you, but with some determination and a little knowledge, it should be over in a couple of nights.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Getting Your Child Out of Your Bed appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/getting-your-child-out-of-your-bed/…