Healing And Preventing The Damage Caused By The Injuries of Snoring

Snoring is dangerous. For example, heavy snoring can cause a quick stoppage of breathing that can easily endanger one’s life. Habitual snoring can lead to some serious health and relationship problems. There really is nothing good about the repercussions of snoring.

There is another repercussion of snoring that we hardly hear of. Apparently, snoring causes injuries that can damage the body.

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea.

(Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/uu-sci043019.php)

Who would have thought that the vibrations caused by snoring can actually be damaging enough to cause some swallowing dysfunction? According to research, it can be.

These findings are reported by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden. Their on-going research focuses on the processes behind vibratory damage and healing of the upper airway tract. The data generated will help identify people at high risk of developing sleep apnea and to find novel treatment strategies.

(Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/uu-sci043019.php)

Clearly, the health risks of snoring are mounting. Hopefully, this particular research could help heal the damage brought about by snoring.

“Besides the disturbing effects, constant snoring can be a significant health risk. Nonetheless, there are indications that our research will guide towards early preventive measures and in the long term also enhance healing of damaged tissue caused by snoring,” says Associate Professor Per Stål, research leader at the Department of Integrative Medical Biology at Umeå University.

(Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-05/uu-sci043019.php)

The findings of the research are not just interesting but alarming as well. According to the findings, patients who snore and suffer from sleep apnea show neuromuscular injuries in their upper respiratory tract. Both snoring and sleep apnea can also damage the nerves and muscles in the soft palate.

Researchers in Umeå have shown that snorers and sleep apnea patients have neuromuscular injuries in the upper respiratory tract. The injuries can be seen at both the structural and molecular level. Researchers could also observe a correlation between snoring and swallowing dysfunction

The Importance of Regular Bedtimes

I know that we tend to view the weekends and summer vacation as an excuse to push bedtimes back and sleep in. After all, it shouldn’t matter what time we get to bed and wake up just as long as we’re getting enough sleep overall, right?

Getting enough sleep at night is definitely crucial to feeling our best the next day, but there’s actually a really good case to be made for going to bed at the same time every night, and getting up at the same time every morning, both for you and your kids. I’ll explain why in this week’s video.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

Study Finds That Women Underestimate Their Snoring

Men snore. They don’t deny that at all. They snore loud and mean that it’s hard to get any sleep beside them. The question is, are men the only snorers? Of course not! Women are snorers too. The funny thing is that they can’t seem to admit it.

In what may be the funniest news this week, a new study is finding that women tend to underreport their own snoring. The study looked at 1,913 patients, the average age of 49 years, who were referred to a sleep disorders center at a university hospital.

(Via: https://interestingengineering.com/women-lie-about-their-snoring-new-study-finds)

There really is nothing glamorous about snoring. Just imagine a weird, almost too annoying, sound coming out from a woman’s mouth. It seems unfitting for a woman to snore; almost too unfeminine.  That probably explains why it’s hard for any woman to admit that she snores.

What they found was that not only did women tend to underreport snoring, they also underestimated its loudness. The study found that 88% of the women snored, but only 72% reported that they snore.

In addition, about 49% of the women had severe or very severe snoring but only 40% of the women rated their snoring at this level. In the meantime, 92.6% of men were found to snore while a nearly identical amount (93.1%) reported snoring.

(Via: https://interestingengineering.com/women-lie-about-their-snoring-new-study-finds)

Another interesting finding is that women actually snore just as loud as men. This might be hard to accept by some women out there but unfortunately, there is some truth in it.

In terms of snoring loudness, the study found that both men and women were approximately at the same level. Women exhibited a mean maximal snoring intensity of 50 decibels and men one of 51.7 decibels.

(Via: https://interestingengineering.com/women-lie-about-their-snoring-new-study-finds)

The study required the participants to report and rate their snoring.  Their snoring was also monitored the whole night. The study seems to show a gap between what the women reported and what was actually monitored the whole night.

For the study, participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire that rated the severity of their

Company Closes Series 2 Funding Round for Continued Development of Daytime Neurostimulator for Snoring, Mild Sleep Apnea

Signifier Medical Technologies, which is developing the “Snoozeal” daytime neurostimulator for snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA),  has closed an oversubscribed Series B funding, aiming to invest further in R&D and prepare the company for commercial stage. With this round, Signifier Medical Technologies has raised a total in excess of $13 million since its founding in 2015.

The new funds will enable Signifier Medical Technologies to:

  • accelerate the data generation in ongoing clinical trials with its Snoozeal with key opinion leaders in sleep conditions in  academic centers, including: University College London; University of California – San Diego and New York Presbyterian – Cornell University;
  • complete the FDA approval process, with de novo filing anticipated in 2019;
  • further invest in expanding its product range, including adding advanced analytics capabilities; and
  • expand the team to broaden its capability set, including commercial readiness in key geographies.

SnooZeal’s technology sends gentle electronic pulses to the back of the tongue to tone the muscles, which the manufacturer states reverses the over-relaxation of the tongue and stops snoring. It is used for for 20 during the day.

“Signifier Medical Technologies is aspiring to revolutionize the sleep market,” says Anshul Sama, BMedSci, BM, BS, FRCS, FRCS, co-founder and chief medical officer of Signifier Medical Technologies, in a release. “For the last few years, we have been developing a novel and ground-breaking device that will help solve the conditions of snoring and mild OSA, which affect over 110 million people in the US and 100 million people in Europe.

“This capital raised will allow us to invest further in R&D and increase our speed of innovation. We are leveraging our proven technology and expanding our pipeline to include additional cutting-edge products that will allow us to extend the indications we can address into the mainstream treatment of OSA. This will enable us to make a real impact on the lives of millions of people, in an area with significant unmet medical need.”

The Series B round was led by The Pritzker Organization, a family merchant bank that focuses on long-term growth capital. It includes participation from new

We Tried It: 3 Popular Anti-Snoring Devices

After years of sleeping next to a snoring partner, A Healthline reporter tries to put an end to noisy nights.

I can’t count how many times I’ve been jolted awake in our San Francisco home thinking “the big one” just hit California, only to realize the rumble that shook me out of my dream was simply my husband, John, snoring less than a foot away.

Suddenly, those ads for over-the-counter snoring gadgets began to look pretty promising.

So, after a particularly noisy night, we recently looked at some of the top options on Amazon and decided to give three different devices a try.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/06/we-tried-it-3-popular-anti-snoring-devices/…

Listen Now: New Interview on Wake Up Narcolepsy’s Narcolepsy 360 Podcast

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of sitting down with Claire Crisp, Executive Director of Wake Up Narcolepsy (WUN), to record an interview for WUN’s Narcolepsy 360 podcast.

This was a meaningful experience and a lot fun to share this conversation with Claire, who is an amazing leader, advocate and friend in the narcolepsy community. We talked about our books, my personal experience with narcolepsy, and what drove me to found Project Sleep. I also shared some behind-the-scenes reflections on Project Sleep’s awareness and advocacy efforts along with some personal advice for others living with narcolepsy. 

Thank you to Claire, Elizabeth & the WUN team for including my story and Project Sleep’s efforts in this great podcast series. Listen now: https://www.wakeupnarcolepsy.org/get-involved/podcast/

from Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-new-interview-on-wake-up-narcolepsys-narcolepsy-360-podcast/…

Seattle! Speaking Sleep Advocacy and Narcolepsy Awareness

Seattle: I’m so excited to visit soon for three speaking engagements!

1.) Speaking Advocacy at the Hypersomnia Education Meeting

I’m extremely honored that the Hypersomnia Foundation has invited me to speak about Project Sleep’s Advocacy at their upcoming Hypersomnia Education Meeting on Saturday, June 29, 2019, taking place from 10am – 3pm at the Seattle Airport Marriott. This event features a lineup of terrific speakers including the always amazing Dr. David Rye!

My Presentation Description: Scientists are making progress, but more research is urgently needed to better understand and treat idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) and other serious  sleep conditions. What can we do as patient advocates to accelerate research? One important approach is through strategic advocacy efforts. In this presentation, Flygare will demystify the advocacy process, highlight recent sleep community successes, and empower attendees with simple steps to take action. Attendees will gain a better understanding of how each of our voices makes a difference in educating decision-makers and advancing research to improve outcomes for those living with sleep conditions including IH.

Learn more and register here: https://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/event/seattle-meeting-2019/

2.) Narcolepsy Presentation with Northwest Narcolepsy Support Group

On Sunday, June 30, 2019, at 11:00 a.m., I will share my inspiring narcolepsy presentation “When Dreams Leave the Night” with the Northwest Narcolepsy Support Group. Please join us for this event, I believe the exact location details are being worked out now, so visit the Northwest Narcolepsy Support Group website to keep up-to-date on the details of this event: www.northwestnarcolepsy.org

Presentation Description: In this presentation, Julie will share her personal journey from facing mysterious symptoms in law school through receiving a narcolepsy diagnosis and becoming an advocate and author.  After her presentation, Julie would be thrilled to hear more about your group’s experiences with narcolepsy, answer any questions, sign books and share awareness materials.

3.) Narcolepsy Presentation for the UW Medicine Sleep Conference 

Last but not least, on Tuesday, July 2nd, I will share my first-hand patient-perspective narcolepsy presentation with the University of Washington Medicine sleep fellows during their Sleep Conference. I love speaking with healthcare professionals and look forward to this …

6 Annoying Reasons Why Couples Are Sleeping In Separate Bedrooms

Have you heard of sleep divorce? Apparently, it’s the reason why more and more relationships are becoming stronger down under in Australia.

Thousands of Australian couples are sleeping in separate beds, with experts claiming that “sleep divorce” is making relationships and sex lives stronger.

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

According to research, sleeping in separate bedrooms is benefiting a lot of marriages.

Author and self-confessed “dedicated separate sleeper”, Jennifer Adams, says research showed more than 200,000 Australian couples were no sleeping in separate beds.

Adams, who wrote Sleeping Apart Not Falling Apart, said she and her husband had been happily married for 14 years despite sleeping in different bedrooms.

“Show me the stats of the divorced couples who shared a bed every night,” the 53-year-old told the Daily Mail.

“Sleeping in separate rooms does not mean the end of a relationship, it’s just a way of maintaining a relationship.

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

It seems kind of odd for a couple to sleep in separate bedrooms but that’s just because it’s the norm. However, the norm isn’t exactly the best thing to do especially when it comes to salvaging a relationship. Think about it.

Jennifer shares how sleep divorce can become more socially acceptable.

“Talking about it openly becomes more socially acceptable. You would be surprised at how many happy married couples out there already doing this.”

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

Sleep divorce might just be the best solution for couples who find it hard to get a good night’s rest beside each other. It’s a more peaceful alternative to fighting the next day because of lack of sleep.

There are six annoying reasons why couples are sleeping in separate bedrooms.

Fly-in-fly-out schedules, shift work, body heat, snoring, farting and blanket theft are all blamed for disrupting sleep, forcing more and more couples to spend bedtime apart.

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

It’s funny that body heat, snoring, farting, and blanket theft are some of the annoying reasons why couples are sleeping in separate rooms. They may sound pretty petty but not when it comes to sleeping. Nothing is petty when it comes to getting a

Sleep Apnea: Why You Feel Tired After a Full Night of Sleep

CNET’s guide goes over the different types of sleep apnea, causes, risk factors, and symptoms to help people understand sleep apnea.

The most common symptom of sleep apnea is snoring, but snoring on its own isn’t always indicative of sleep apnea. Snoring followed by silent pauses, gasping or choking sounds is likely a sign of sleep apnea.

Because sleep apnea wakes you up frequently throughout the night (even if you don’t notice it), you can suffer from symptoms of sleep deprivation, such as daytime fatigue, difficulty concentrating, unintentional napping and irritability or mood swings.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/06/sleep-apnea-why-you-feel-tired-after-a-full-night-of-sleep/…

3 Tips for Nap Time Success

Once they’ve committed to a sleep coaching program, most parents tend to see results in their baby’s nighttime sleep in as little as two or three nights.

But when it comes to naps, things tend to move a whole lot slower.

There are a few reasons for this. The sun is out, there’s more environmental noise, and there’s just a lot more activity surrounding them during the day, which can all lead to poor-quality naps during the day.

And as you might have already figured out, lousy naps lead to overtiredness at bedtime, and overtiredness leads to bad nighttime sleep, which leads to bad naps the next day, and the whole cycle just perpetuates itself.

So today, I’ve got three great tips for you to solve those daytime sleep woes and get your baby taking long, restful naps during the day, which will work wonders in getting them out of the overtiredness trap and into a predictable, consistent sleep schedule.

Rather read than watch? Click here.