The 2019 MAD Mouthpiece Award Goes To ZQuiet

The winner is …ZQuiet. Yes! ZQuiet wins the award for being the best MAD mouthpiece for 2019. Awarded  by The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, ZQuiet tops a long list of MAD mouthpieces in the market.

As part of its commitment to offering unbiased, rigorous reviews of snoring cessation products such as mouthpieces, pillows, chin straps and software applications, The Snoring Mouthpiece Review has awarded the ZQuiet® its 2019 MAD Mouthpiece of the Year, beating out other rivals in the category.

(Via: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/snoring-mouthpiece-review-awards-zquiet-163000326.html)

MAD stands for Mandibular Advancement Device and it is one of the two categories of snoring mouthpieces. The second category is composed of the TSD or Tongue Stabilizing Devices.

Snoring mouthpieces are typically categorized in one of two ways: 1. MAD or Mandibular Advancement Device, and 2. TSD or Tongue Stabilizing Devices. The MAD category remains the most popular in the realm of anti snoring mouthpieces, with TSD devices quickly gaining ground thanks to the key star in the category, the Good Morning Snore Solution.

The MAD category features literally 15-20 other major mouthpiece manufacturers doing battle for snoring mouthpiece supremacy, so separating individual products can be tough for the inexperienced user.

(Via: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/snoring-mouthpiece-review-awards-zquiet-163000326.html)

What makes ZQuiet the best MAD snoring mouthpiece? According to Steve Walker of The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, the design of ZQuiet is what makes it stand out in the market.

“We truly believe that the ZQuiet, at least when it comes to Mandibular Adjustment Devices, is easily the best and most usable mouthpiece of 2019,” said Steve Walker, spokesman for The Snoring Mouthpiece Review. “Its design remains a really unique selling point, as it allows freedom of movement where many other MAD designs do not.”

One of the key drawbacks for many MAD users is that this style of mouthpiece tends to lock the jaw in position – a problem that can create many issues. As an example, some MAD mouthpieces do not allow you to breathe through your mouth, which is a problem for many snorers. Additionally, by freezing the jaw in place, many people can become subject to problems with the

Jacksonville is America’s Top Snoring City According To Study

Can you believe this? Jacksonville has more snorers than any other cities in the U.S. If you don’t believe it, take a look at this.

When it comes to snoring, no other U.S. city tops Jacksonville.

That’s according to a recent study by Withings, which makes products that measure health, such as activity-tracking watches, scales and health monitors.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

One thing is for sure. Jacksonville is one noisy city. You might be wondering how the study was able to come up with such conclusion. Here’s how it was done.

Using data from health tracking devices, Withings found the users tracked in Jacksonville snore over five times a night with snore durations reaching one hour, 12 minutes.

By comparison, the national average for snoring was 2.65 times a night.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

Here’s what they found.

Withings also found the Jacksonville people tracked in the study stayed up later than most of the nation, putting the city in the top five for night owls.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

While Jacksonville tops the snoring category, it’s not exactly the city where you will find the late sleepers. Although it’s in the top 5 late night cities, it’s number 5.

Top Late-Night Cities: Cities with the Latest Average Bedtimes
1.) Philadelphia – 12:40 a.m.
2.) New York City – 12:36 a.m.
3.) Los Angeles – 12:30 a.m.
4.) Miami – 12:28 a.m.
5.) Jacksonville – 12:24 a.m.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

The study also shows that the person’s BMI or the body mass index has a lot to do with snoring.

Withings’ data showed a significant correlation between a person’s body mass index (BMI) and snoring in both men and women. The higher the BMI, the more likely a person is to be a heavy snorer.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

According to the study, men are more likely to snore heavily than women.

Withings found men were two times more likely to be heavy snorers than women.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

Snoring should not be taken lightly. There’s a good reason why.  Read on and find out.

Snoring and nighttime breathing disturbances can impact the

Opioids Are Not Sleep Aids—They Can Actually Worsen Sleep

Evidence that taking opioids will help people with chronic pain to sleep better is limited and of poor quality, according to an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and medics from the University of Warwick in partnership with Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.

Many people suffering from long-term chronic pain use opioids as a sleep aid to take away pain and stop their sleep being disrupted. However, a new study led by the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick with Warwick Medical School suggests that not enough research has been done to assess the benefits and risks of using painkillers for the purpose of improving sleep quality.

Their study, a systematic review of existing research on the effects of opioids on sleep, has been published in Sleep Medicine Reviews.

Sleep disruption is a particularly frequent issue for patients with chronic pain, with a vicious cycle building between bad nights and increased pain. Patients with chronic pain are often empirically prescribed opioids to reduce their pain enough to get a good night’s sleep, but there has been little investigation of whether this is a safe and effective intervention.

The researchers conducted a comprehensive systematic review of existing literature that examined the effects of opioids on sleep quality. As part of this, they conducted a meta-analysis of data from these studies, combining the results of 18 studies which were then narrowed down to 5 with comparable data.

They found that research on opioid effects on sleep quality was limited and of poor quality, often with potential publication bias and conflicts of interest, and rarely testing patients for sleep apnea prior to and during the study.

Patients reported a small improvement in sleep quality when using opioids but that was not consistent with results derived from sleep assessment technologies, such as the total time and the percentage of time in deep sleep, which did not show an improvement.

Certain studies reported calmer sleep with less movement but the examined articles frequently did not examine the wider effects of opioid therapy such as subsequent functioning during the day. Where they did, reports of sedation

Promoting Long, Restful Naps

I’ve worked with a lot of parents who are under the impression that, if their baby doesn’t sleep during the day, they’ll sleep better at night. After all, he’ll be so tired when bedtime rolls around that he’ll just conk out and sleep peacefully until late the next morning. Right?

Wrong! Naps are an essential part of your little one’s sleep schedule, and skipping them or moving them around will have a negative effect of baby’s nighttime sleep. In today’s video, I’ll explain why, and how you can help to ensure that your baby gets the long, restful daytime naps he needs.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

4 Surprising Reasons Why You Snore

Do you ever wonder why you snore? Are you one of those folks who think sheer exhaustion is the reason for snoring? Well, if you are; think again. Sheer exhaustion is not the cause of your snoring.

There are 4 surprising reasons why you snore. One of these surprising reasons is your weight.

No one likes to talk about their waistline, but it is something to remember when trying to cut down on snoring. According to the National Sleep Foundation, “Being overweight leads to poor muscle tone and increases the tissue around the neck and throat.” With regular physical activity and a balanced diet, these muscles will become stronger and snoring may begin to decrease.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Another probable cause of your snoring is your alcohol intake. Maybe it’s time to cut down on it.

Having a little too much to drink before bedtime can bring on snoring. Alcohol relaxes the throat muscles, therefore lowering defense against airway obstruction. If you are planning on drinking, consider having your glass of wine a few hours before bed or avoid consuming alcohol altogether.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Your sleeping position could also be the reason why you snore. Apparently, sleeping on your back can make you snore more.

Everyone has their preferred way of drifting off to dreamland, but these sleep patterns can cause snoring too. The Mayo Clinic states that sleeping on your back narrows the airways, causing snoring. An easy fix is to change your sleep style. Sleeping on your side or on your stomach may reduce the likelihood of snoring.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Another cause of your snoring is that you could be suffering from a sleep disorder called sleep apnea. Unfortunately, snoring is a sign of sleep apnea. This is something that you should look into especially if your snoring is really loud and you wake up grasping for air.

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that causes you to stop breathing or gasp for air in the middle if the night. Loud snoring, feeling tired after a full night’s sleep, and gasping for air are some of

Study Links Sleep-disordered Breathing to Age Acceleration

Increasing severity of sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption are associated with epigenetic age acceleration, according to preliminary results of a new study.

Results show that each standard deviation increase in the apnea-hypopnea index, a measure of sleep-disordered breathing severity, was associated with the equivalent of 215 days of biological age acceleration. Similarly, each standard deviation increase in the arousal index, a measure of sleep disruption, was associated with the equivalent of 321 days of age acceleration.

“People’s biological age might not be the same as their chronological age,” said lead author Xiaoyu Li, ScD, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. “Individuals whose biological age is higher than their chronological age exhibit age acceleration or fast aging. In our study, we found that more severe sleep-disordered breathing is associated with epigenetic age acceleration. Our data provide biological evidence supporting adverse physiological and health effects of untreated sleep-disordered breathing.”

Sleep-disordered breathing, such as obstructive sleep apnea, is characterized by abnormalities of respiration during sleep. Episodes often result in reductions in blood oxygen saturation and are usually terminated by brief arousals from sleep. Nearly 30 million adults in the U.S. have obstructive sleep apnea. Common warning signs include snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness.

According to the authors, epigenetic age acceleration is a DNA methylation-based marker of fast biological aging, and it is associated with modifiable lifestyle factors. Although sleep-disordered breathing is associated with multiple age-related health disorders, its relationship with epigenetic aging has not been well studied.

The study involved 622 adults with a mean age of 69 years; 53.2% were women. Participants were measured for blood DNA methylation, and their sleep was evaluated at home by polysomnography. Age acceleration measures were calculated as residuals from the regression of each epigenetic age on chronological age. The association of each sleep-disordered breathing trait with age acceleration was estimated using linear regression, controlling for socio-demographics, health behaviors, body

Snoring Remedies That Actually Work

We all want a good night’s sleep. That’s why we all look forward to sleeping when we get home from work. It’s the ultimate break from all the chaos and stress of the day. We all need to get a good night’s sleep to be able to rejuvenate. Unfortunately, there’s a major road block to getting a good night’s sleep and that is snoring.

According to The National Sleep Foundation, frequent snoring affects more than 100 million people in the U.S. Even more people experience infrequent snoring and may suffer from poor quality sleep. It will affect both the snorers and their partners, and may cause disrupted sleep for your entire family. It explains the high interest in quick fixes by snorers.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

We snore because the airflow in our nose and mouth is restricted. It is blocked by the tissues surrounding both our nose and mouth.

Snoring is caused by restricted airflow in the mouth and nose. When it is blocked by your esophageal and nasal tissues, air will cause an increased likelihood of vibration, which will be translated into sound.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

There are several causes of snoring. Allergies, sleeping pills, and heavy intake of alcohol could all cause someone to snore. Sleep apnea can definitely cause someone to snore all the time.

Common causes of snoring include underlying medical conditions such as sleep apnea, and allergies, or the use of sleeping pills or alcohol before bed.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

Not all snores are the same. Interestingly, there are different kinds of snorers.

Depending on the tissue involved, there are several types of snorers. Nasal snorers will experience snoring because of blocked passages or a deviated septum. Tongue-based snorers will often snore when the tongue is in a hyper-relaxed state. Mouth snorers sleep through their mouth while sleeping, which may cause the soft palate tissues to vibrate against each other.

(Via: https://theinscribermag.com/snoring-remedies-for-a-better-night/)

Whether the snore is coming from the nose, tongue, or the mouth, one thing is the same. The snore is irritating and it can hinder a peaceful sleep. Luckily, there are snoring …

3 Biggest Bedtime Mistakes

If your little one’s not sleeping well, the first place to look for the problem is at bedtime. A well-crafted, consistent bedtime routine is the foundation for great sleep skills, but what’s the secret to crafting one that works? I’ve got three great tips for you in today’s video to help you do just that!

Rather read than watch? Click here.

A Tale To Tell: A Funny Story On Snoring

Here’s a funny story. It’s about a husband who learned to stop his snoring on his own. Well, actually he got some help from his wife. But of course, he won’t admit that.

He starts his story animatedly, describing how his wife recorded his snoring.

My wife complained that I snore.

Ever forgiving in other aspects of our co-habitation, she decided to record me in the act.

She played it back while I was sleeping. She played it back in all its orchestral glory, thinking this might cure me.

But she says I broke into a two-part harmony.

She tried giving me left hooks and I woke up with bruises up my arm.

She said, “I thought you were dead. You stopped breathing.”

I heard, “You stopped breeding.”

“I was doing it in my sleep!” I exclaimed.

(Via: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/first-person/article-how-i-learned-to-stop-snoring-reluctantly/)

Aside from his snoring issues, the husband obviously has some hearing issues as well. Poor wife has to put up with both. Then again, you got to hand it to the husband, he eventually admitted that he had a snoring problem.

It takes a certain amount of self-criticism to reach the conclusion that your wife might be right about: a) your snoring, and b) about the need to do something about your snoring. So, as the final submission of the snorer to the snoree, I agreed to go to a sleep clinic to be tested.

(Via: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/first-person/article-how-i-learned-to-stop-snoring-reluctantly/)

So, he went to a sleep clinic. He checked himself in right in the middle of winter. You’d think the sleep clinic would be a posh, comfortable place. Based on his description, it was a far cry from it.

The bedroom I was assigned to was like a room in the Bates Motel. The art on the wall was enough to give me nightmares – blackbirds with yellow eyes, although the caption read, “Moonlight over the Prairies.”

The technician went to work on me. He placed suction caps with wires on my head and face. The wires were inserted into a box at my bedside that would transmit my brainwaves and

How to Find The Right Pillow

pillows

When you purchase your first bed, you can easily spend more than 1000 dollars. After that, you may be tempted to settle for an inexpensive set of pillows. That could be a mistake. Choosing a pillow is an important task. It can seriously impact the quality of sleep you get each night. If you select a low-quality pillow, or simply one that is wrong for you, that can lead to poor sleep. Do you suffer from neck or shoulder pain? Your pillow could be the issue. It’s time to answer the question, ‘what pillow is best for me?’

What Type of Pillow do I Need?

Let’s talk about how you sleep. Even those of us who move tend to have a preferred position, side, back, or stomach. The best way to tell is to remember the position you’re in when you wake up. Test this over a few nights, and choose the position you are in most of the time. Different pillows are a better fit for different sleep styles.

Matching Your Pillow Type to Your Sleep Style

If you discover that you’re a side sleeper, check out pillows that are relatively thick and firm. These will provide the neck support you need without sacrificing comfort. Stomach sleepers are rare, but if this is you, go for soft and relatively flat. If possible, consider going out a pillow. A flatter pillow will keep your silhouette straight so that your neck isn’t craned in an awkward position. Finally, back sleepers need a mid-thickness pillow. You don’t want it so thick that it pushes your chin into your chest though.

How to Pick a Pillow: What’s on The Inside Really Does Matter

Your pillow can be filled with a variety of different things. This can impact price, comfort, and whether or not the pillow is what you need. Before you look, make a list of any health conditions you have that could be impacted by your choice.

Remember that your pillow impacts the position of your head and neck. It will be touching your bare skin for eight hours or so each …