Listen Now: CALM + COZY podcast interview

Apparently I felt comfortable and a bit snarky on the day that I recorded this CALM + COZY podcast interview with the amazing host, Beth Wyatt (@sleepcoachbeth on IG), because I’m pretty honest and animated here!

Beth asked great questions that led to unique conversations not part of my usual “talking points” repertoire. My favorite discussion came after Beth asked:

“What advice would you give someone approaching their primary care doctor about a possible sleep disorder?”

I’d love to hear YOUR thoughts on this topic too. It’s not always easy to get primary care doctors to consider a sleep consult. 

Beth: Thank you for this terrific opportunity to share my story and my passion for Project Sleep. I’m forever grateful to call you my friend and fellow sleep advocate!

Listen to the podcast interview now and let me know what you think in the comments below!

from Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-calm-cozy-podcast-interview/…

Bedtime Routines

We’ve all got a little ritual we go through when we’re putting our kids to bed. We obviously need to get them into appropriate sleeping attire, get their teeth brushed, change their diaper and so on, but what a lot of people don’t realize is that a bedtime routine is a really effective tool for getting your baby to sleep.

When done right, the bedtime routine helps baby’s brain to realize that it’s almost time for bed, which prompts melatonin production and helps get your little one ready for a nice, easy transition into sleep.

In today’s video, I’ll give you a few tips for creating an ideal bedtime routine that will kick those sleepy hormones into gear and help set you and your baby up for a successful snooze night after night.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Bedtime Routines appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/bedtime-routines/…

Sleep Solutions You Can Try

We all want to get some sleep. We need it. There’s no way we can function well if we are sleep deprived. Sleeping is as important as eating. If we’re not getting any sleep, we are useless.

One of the common reasons as to why we cannot get any sleep is that we snore or we’re sleeping beside one who does.

Around 40% of adult men and 24% of adult women snore regularly. The odds are you or your significant other fall into this group of loud sleepers.

(Via: https://theurbantwist.com/2019/06/12/search-for-the-ultimate-snore-silencer-5-solutions-to-help-you-sleep/)

Snoring can really ruin the quality of our sleep. If you’re sleeping beside one who snores, you won’t even be able to get any sleep at all. Not a wink for you and that’s bad for you, your partner, and your health.

While you’ve promised to stay by each other’s side through thick and thin, the snoring may be testing your patience.

(Via: https://theurbantwist.com/2019/06/12/search-for-the-ultimate-snore-silencer-5-solutions-to-help-you-sleep/)

There are solutions you can try. If you’re not the snorer, you can certainly share these solutions with someone who snores. Chances are, that someone could be your partner. Sharing these solutions is a better way to deal with the situation rather resenting your snoring partner.

You can always try sleeping in separate bedrooms but that’s a very temporary solution. Sleeping away from your snoring partner is just going to help you. It will not, in any way, help your snoring partner. As a matter of fact, it might even hurt your snoring partner.

If your partner snores heavily, the more he or she will need you to stay close by. Heavy snoring is a manifestation of stoppage of breathing. As annoying as it may sound, you may need to wake up your snoring partner when you hear him or her struggle for air.

One solution that you can consider for your partner or for yourself (that is, if you’re a heavy snorer), is the CPAP machine.

First of all, you should check to make sure your snoring isn’t a result of something more serious, such as sleep apnea. This disorder can lead to

Why is My Baby Waking Up at Night?

Life would be a whole lot easier if babies came with an interpreter. Crying is basically their only way to let you know something’s bothering them, but it can mean anything from hunger to a wet diaper to tiredness, and everything in between.

And when they’re crying in the night for no apparent reason, that inability to communicate can be frustrating for both of you.

But take heart! In today’s video, I’m going to run through some of the reasons your little one might be waking repeatedly in the night, how you can determine which one is afflicting your baby in the moment, and how best to get them back to sleep and staying asleep through the night.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Why is My Baby Waking Up at Night? appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/why-is-my-baby-waking-up-at-night/…

Say Goodbye To Snoring With Oral Appliance Therapy

There’s a solution to your snoring problem. It’s called Oral Appliance Therapy. According to dentist, Dr. Micheal Uzelac, Oral Appliance Therapy works.

Uzelac, who had been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), had an oral appliance made to help reduce his disrupted breathing during sleep due to snoring. It worked.

“I slept soundly for three nights in a row, and I felt wonderful,” he said.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Oral Appliance Therapy may not be the common solution to snoring. Dr. Uzelac states that using a CPAP machine is the most common way to treat snoring. A CPAP machine can help reduce disrupted breathing during sleep.

“The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea right now is the CPAP machine,” Uzelac said. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) involves wearing a mask or nasal cannula connected to a machine that delivers pressured air during sleep.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

CPAP machines may be popular but they’re not well-liked by snorers who are looking for a more comfortable and presentable way to solve their problem.

“The problem is, about 58% of people who are prescribed a CPAP machine don’t wear it,” Uzelac said. Some perceive the devices to be bulky, cumbersome, and uncomfortable.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

A better way to approach OSA and snoring is with the use of an oral appliance that could be custom-fitted to your mouth.

“With obstructive sleep apnea, the muscles in the throat relax and block breathing. Oral appliance therapy works like putting a door stop in a door,” Uzelac said. “The appliances help pull the jaw forward so the muscles can’t relax and block breathing.”

More than 100 oral appliances are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of OSA. They look like retainers or mouth guards, and simply fit over the upper and lower teeth.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Take note that oral appliance therapy is best for folks who aren’t suffering from severe apnea. Here’s what Dr. Uzelac has to say about it.

Uzelac said those who tend to respond best to oral appliance therapy are those with less severe apnea, women ages

Breakthrough Study Reveals Cure for Snoring

There’s a cure and it’s being kept quiet…

Every night, in homes across the country, bedrooms reverberate with the trumpeting, whistling, whining and grunting of the nation’s snorers.

It’s a deafening cacophony that blights an estimated 60 percent of the population — and their long-suffering partners — and fuels a lucrative and ever-growing trade in snore-busting gadgets and remedies.

But as anyone who’s tried the throat sprays, nasal dilators, jaw slings, magic pillows or mouth splints that claim to ease snoring will know, snoring is infuriatingly difficult to fix.

It is just one more insulting consequence of the aging process, and therefore extremely common. But despite that, few people appreciate quite how debilitating it can be to your health and your relationships.

The snorer might sound as if they are blissfully sleeping, but their body will be struggling to get air in and out through slack and floppy airways and this extra effort will ultimately compromise the quality of the deeply restorative phases of sleep.

This is the time when the vitally important mental and physical repair process is supposed to happen, and the heart should be able to slow and rest.

Although snoring is more likely to occur if you are overweight, it can also trap you in a vicious cycle whereby the snoring itself triggers weight gain. Studies show poor sleep typically stimulates the appetite for sweet and fatty foods as your body fights to cope with fatigue.

As long-term snoring causes protracted sleep deprivation, which in turn means your snoring worsens, the weight piles on. This then increases your risk of obesity-related disorders such as diabetes, heart disease, even some cancers.

Snoring is a potent trigger for bitterness, ridicule, and resentment in relationships and studies show that for around 6 percent of couples, bad snoring can be enough to trigger marriage breakdown.

Inveterate snorers, and therefore their bed partners, rarely get close to achieving even the lower recommended target of six hours of restful sleep each night. Studies show the partner of a snorer loses 90 minutes of sleep most nights and so gradually builds a sleep …

Snoring: When Should You Worry About It?

Snorers are often the butt of jokes. We make fun of them but in reality, they’re not funny at all. As a matter of fact, they probably need more of our help than our usual sarcasm about their snoring. For all we know, the snoring could be a sign of something more serious.

No matter how you define it, snoring is a common habit for both men and women. It’s typically most common for men, but for any person, your chances of snoring start to increase as you get older. Although this problem is usually just mildly annoying (or funny), there are times when snoring can be related to a serious condition called sleep apnea.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

While snorers may look and sound funny while sleeping, they’re actually struggling to catch some air.

WebMD says that people snore when there’s a physical obstruction interrupting the flow of air through the mouth and nose.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

The causes of physical obstruction are the following:

1. Blocked nasal passages – Mucous or physical growths or changes in your nasal cavity can change the flow of air through your system.
2. Bulky throat tissue – If you’re slightly overweight or if you have large tonsils, you’re more likely to snore.
3. Poor muscle tone – If the muscles in your throat or tongue are too relaxed, they can collapse and get in the way as air is passing through. As you get older, these muscles start to relax more.
4. Long soft plate and/or uvula – This tissue can narrow the opening from your nose to your throat. It dangles in the back of your mouth and, when they bump against each other, it can block your airway, which causes snoring.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

While it’s natural for everyone to snore, we really shouldn’t make fun of a snore that is unusually loud. An unusually loud snore is something we should really worry about.

If your snoring is louder than normal, you wake up feeling tired and your breathing stops and starts throughout the night, it’s possible you might have

More Than 936 Million Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea Worldwide

More than 936 million people have obstructive sleep apnea—the disorder’s first prevalence update in more than a decade—according to The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

The Lancet published a multinational analysis by ResMed and 12 sleep researchers. The results were first presented at the American Thoracic Society 2018 International Conference in San Diego.

This figure is nearly 10 times greater than the World Health Organization’s 2007 estimate of more than 100 million, renewing calls for physicians to step up their efforts to screen, diagnose, and prescribe treatment for those who unknowingly have the disorder.

“More than 85% of sleep apnea patients are undiagnosed, meaning hundreds of millions repeatedly suffocate instead of getting healthy, restful sleep each night,” says Carlos M. Nunez, MD, a study coauthor and ResMed’s chief medical officer, in a release. “This raises their risk of workplace and roadway accidents, and can contribute to other significant health problems, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, or even poor glucose control for diabetic patients. We know the risks, and now we know the size of the problem is nearly 10 times greater than previously thought. Addressing it starts with screening patients we know to be high-risk.”

Why Is Sleep Apnea Mostly Undiagnosed?

“Many will attribute the resulting tiredness to aging or stress,” says Nunez. “Others will mention the problem to their doctor, only to be misdiagnosed with insomnia, migraines, chronic fatigue, or other conditions. Misdiagnosis is especially common with women, since sleep apnea was long thought to be much more common in men.”

Today, women account for 40% of newly diagnosed sleep apnea patients.

Another reason may be undiagnosed can be blamed on cultural ideas of what constitutes good sleep.

“For instance, some believe snoring may simply be a normal feature of how some people sleep, when in fact it’s one of the most important signs for the risk of having sleep apnea,” Nunez says. “With a global prevalence that approaches 1 billion people, patients and physicians need to consider the risks and ask the questions that may ultimately help them sleep and live better. This is no longer a problem that

Creating the Perfect Sleep Environment

When it comes to decorating baby’s nursery, we tend to pay a lot of attention to the visual appeal and not think so much about the practicality. Mobiles, night lights, star projectors, and faux aquariums may look nice to us, but they might be standing in the way of a good night’s sleep.

In today’s video, I’ve got some practical tips to help you create an ideal environment to help your baby get to sleep and stay asleep, and do it on a razor-thin budget!

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Creating the Perfect Sleep Environment appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/creating-the-perfect-sleep-environment/…

Can This Smart Strap Actually Stop Snoring?

Snoring is such a big deal nowadays. Well, it should be. Considering the high percentage of habitual snorers these days, it’s high time we take snoring seriously.

According to research, 40-percent of adult men and 24-percent of adult women snore habitually. It’s cited as a key issue in preventing people from getting a solid night’s rest, either because they themselves are snoring, or the person next to them are.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

Snoring not just affects the snorer. It also affects other people who are bothered by the loud noise. It’s hard to sleep with someone who snores. No one gets quality sleep with a snorer around. That pretty much contributes to the reason why snoring is such a big deal these days.

It all sounds faintly ridiculous, but snoring is a big deal – both in terms of annual relief spending, and for potential long term health implications. Snoring can be a strong risk factor for hypertension, for instance, while if left untreated it can eventually lead to Obstructive Sleep Apnoea, or OSA. That’s where the walls of the throat narrow during sleep, making it harder to breathe.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

OSA is a serious disease. It can lead to other health issues that could be deadly at some point.

Over time, OSA can lead to an increased risk of stroke or heart attack, to atrial fibrillation, and even make it more likely that you’ll develop type 2 diabetes.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

That explains why there is an urgent need to stop snoring.

Stopping snoring isn’t going to instantly prevent all that from happening, but it’s a good first step, and doctors typically look at snoring as an early symptom that there’s something going wrong when you’re in bed.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

The question is, can a smart strap like the Phillips’ Smart Snoring Relief Band actually stop snoring? Before we answer that, let’s take a close look at it first.

The latest addition to the company’s sleep-focused range, the Philips SleepSmart Snoring Relief Band replaces giving your bedmate a swift kick when they’re making too much noise.