Demystifying Intraoral Scanning in Dental Sleep Medicine

A Diplomate shows dentists the ins and outs of accurate digital impressions for sleep appliances.

Intraoral dental scanners provide dentists with a tool that can digitally capture the images of teeth and surrounding soft tissue with astonishing accuracy. The clinician simply waves a rather expensive wand over the teeth and a rotatable image instantly appears on the screen. This new technology can represent an opportunity to replace old methods with one that is faster and more comfortable for the patient. But the unknowns of scanning can be intimidating, as is the case for many dentists whose training and experience have always focused on physical impressions and plaster models. Although the presence of scanners in dentistry is becoming increasingly more common, it is estimated that less than 25% of dental offices own a scanner, and those that do tend to be larger multi-dentist practices.1

How do a scanner handpiece and a computer produce a printable 3D image? As Yale University professor of biomedical engineering James Duncan, PhD, a pioneer in 3D image technology, explains, scanners “gather information about the shape and size of dental structure or arches as well as the position of implants by first projecting structured light (basically a light grid pattern) or a laser beam onto a tooth’s surface and then recording how the pattern or the beam is changed or distorted when it hits the surface using very high resolution cameras. Then software is used to reconstruct or form a full 3D model of the structure by fitting a polygonal mesh to a large set of points that cover the tooth or teeth being studied.”

In dentistry, increased accuracy means fewer remakes and reduced chair time for insertion adjustments. Recent tests on in-vitro models have shown scanners to have accuracies (trueness) in the range of 50 micrometers (ranging from 20 to about 100 micrometers).2,3 David Walton, CEO and founder of sleep apnea therapy company Respire Medical (acquired by Whole You), welcomes scans for oral appliances. “Due to the accuracy of digital scans, not

When Snoring Becomes Deadly

We know that snoring kills. If it isn’t addressed and treated, it can lead to a lot of health complications that can eventually kill the snorer.

However, we don’t really hear a lot of stories on snorers being murdered for the obvious and annoying reason that they snore. Hopefully, there aren’t a lot of stories on it but unfortunately, there’s one that came out on May 1.

A woman at a UK hospital died two weeks after a hotheaded patient whacked her in the head because she was annoyed by her snoring, a report said.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Now, that is one sad news. Needless to say, it’s a senseless murder. How could anyone kill anyone and for what? For snoring? It’s totally absurd but it’s true. It happened.

Mom of five Eileen Bunting, 64, was attacked and hit in the head with a cup while she was in a hospital bed at the Hull Royal Infirmary in Hull, England, on March 22, The Sun reported.

Bunting, who was left with a bloody gash on her forehead, was slated to be released from the hospital the day after the attack, but after she was assaulted, her health quickly declined.

She died April 4, according to the news outlet.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Apparently, Bunting’s snoring had become a serious issue for one patient who just couldn’t take it anymore. The sad part is that the attack seemed like it was well-laid out.

The victim’s son told local media that he believed the assault was a “premeditated” attack after it was discovered that the unidentified patient who went after his mother had tied the hospital room’s door handles together to prevent anyone from coming inside.

“The nurses must have been doing the rounds, noticed the doors were shut and found my mom full of blood and her stood over her with a cup,” Bunting’s son, Mark Bunting, told Hull Live, according to the report.
“The doors had been pulled to and tied together with a blanket and then she proceeded to attack my mom. It was premeditated,” the devastated son said.

(Via: …

Baby Wakes Up When I Put Her In the Crib

How many times have you been through this situation? You rock your baby to sleep in your arms until she’s out like a light, and then the moment you put her into her crib, her eyes pop open and she won’t go back to sleep no matter what you do.

I honestly don’t think I’ve ever met a parent who hasn’t experienced this, and it’s just as confusing for each and every one of them. Why on earth would a peacefully sleeping baby wake up the minute they get put into their bed?

Well, I’m happy to tell you that there’s actually a pretty logical explanation, as well as an easy way to solve the problem. I’ll share both with you in this week’s video!

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Baby Wakes Up When I Put Her In the Crib appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/baby-wakes-up-when-i-put-her-in-the-crib/…

Toward a Better Understanding of Sleep Surgery

The international sleep medicine community gathered in New York City to discuss hypoglossal neurostimulation therapy, personalized treatment of sleep apnea, snoring and much more.

Picture an international gathering of expert sleep apnea surgeons, sleep medicine specialists, and dental sleep medicine practitioners and you have the 10th International Surgical Sleep Society meeting that took place in New York City from May 9-11, 2019. About 400 attendees from 36 countries met to discuss the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), updates on current treatments, and future directions for OSA treatment. About 100 speakers from around the world participated in presentations and lively discussions.

“The concept of the meeting was to provide highly concise, high level presentations on advanced OSA topics and to stimulate open, intellectual, collegial exchange in and out of the sessions,” says Ofer Jacobowitz, MD, PhD, co-director of sleep at ENT and Allergy Associates, NY, who chaired the meeting with Maria Suurna, MD, from Weill Cornell Medicine, NY. The format allowed for question and answer sessions to encourage interaction of attendees with international sleep surgery experts.

Immediately prior to the main meeting, a special research forum entitled “Maximizing success of implantable hypoglossal neurostimulation therapy” was held at Steelcase in New York City. The option of hypoglossal neurostimulation (HGNS) is an addition to the treatment array for CPAP-intolerant patients and fosters collaboration between sleep medicine and surgery specialists. International experts discussed a variety of HGNS topics such as: which measures of OSA disease burden should be used to define success, patient features that may predict apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) reduction, technical aspects of implantation and stimulation, and possible sequential or concurrent treatments to optimize success. Currently body mass index, AHI, and sleep endoscopy are used to select patients for HGNS, but meeting presenters said that more precise criteria are needed.

Experts said it appears that women may be more likely to have success with HGNS. In contrast, those whose OSA has a significant psychophysiological insomnia component may not tolerate stimulation well and thus perhaps should be screened out. Optimization of outcome was an important topic, including combination therapy of HGNS with upper

Snoring: A Problem For Both Men And Women

Ladies, listen up. If you find yourselves complaining about how bad your boyfriend or hubby snores, stop for a moment. Make sure that you don’t snore because if you do, well, your boyfriend or hubby could be complaining about it as well. Be careful with what you say because you could be a snorer as well.

It turns out that men are not the only ones that snore according to a new study.

“We found that although no difference in snoring intensity was found between genders, women tend to underreport the fact that they snore and to underestimate the loudness of their snoring,” said Dr. Nimrod Maimon.

The study found that 88 percent of women snore, but only 72 percent admit to doing so. 93 percent of men both snored and reported snoring.

(Via: http://www.wlsam.com/2019/04/30/snoring-not-just-an-issue-for-men/)

So, ladies, face it. You probably snore as well. Maybe not as loud as your partner but you probably snore as well. Admitting it can be hard but it’s a good start if you really want to solve your snoring problem.

No one wants to admit that he or she is a snorer. After all, snoring is not something anyone would be proud of doing. It’s embarrassing to snore. For a lady to snore, it’s a total turn off.

The thing is, everybody snores. It’s a fact. No one can deny that. So instead of putting the blame on your boyfriend or husband, take the first step to see if you snore as well. Then deal with it.

Ladies, just because your snoring isn’t as loud as your partner’s doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get any help. The fact is, there are real dangers to consider with snoring.

“The fact that women reported snoring less often and described it as milder may be one of the barriers preventing women from reaching sleep clinics for a sleep study,” Dr. Maimon said.
Snoring can be due to sleep apnea, a sleeping disorder that can lead to an array of health issues.

(Via: http://www.wlsam.com/2019/04/30/snoring-not-just-an-issue-for-men/)

Snoring can lead to a lot of health problems. Before getting …

Could These Mouth Workouts Stop Snoring?

Have you ever heard of mouth workouts? Apparently, they exist and they’re supposed to help stop snoring. The question is, do they actually work?

Before we get into that, here’s a little trivia for you. Did you know that men snore more than women? Yes, they do.

Around 40 per cent of men over 30 snore and around 30 per cent of women do.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Of course, that doesn’t delete the fact that women snore as well. There just less women who snore.

It’s really not a matter of who snores more or who snores less. The point is, there is always someone who snores and that could be you. Snoring is not something that we should take lightly.

If left untreated, it can turn into sleep apnea – a potentially life-threatening sleeping disorder which sees people have heart attacks in the middle of the night.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

So, if you snore or you know of someone who snores, it’s time to incorporate some mouth workouts before going to sleep.

Because one expert maintains that not only is snoring a voluntary habit but also that it can be treated with a five-minute workout.

Mike Dilkes is an ear, nose and throat surgeon at London’s Hospital of St John and St Elizabeth, and he’s been telling the Telegraph that while snoring is “not a habit you may choose to have…(it’s) one you can choose to stop”.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

If this is the first time you’ve heard of mouth workouts to stop snoring, then why not give it shot? After all, snoring is not something we should all take lightly.

So it’s not just that snoring is annoying for everyone else to hear and can sometimes disrupt our own sleep, it can be really dangerous.

(Via: https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/8842466/simple-workout-stop-snoring/)

Snoring happens because the muscles of the throat relax and collapse while the body is asleep. With the workout exercises, the muscles can get fit again.

Mike says that snoring is often caused by a loss of muscle tone; at night, everything relaxes and collapses. But that collapse can

Developmental Milestones

Teething, rolling over, learning to stand up, these are all wonderful moments in your baby’s development that you’ll remember forever.

When it comes to their sleep though, developmental milestones can be a real impediment to them getting to sleep and staying asleep through the night.

In today’s video, I’ve got some great tips to help you minimize the fallout from these hiccups and help keep your baby on track during naps and through the night while they master these newfound abilities.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Developmental Milestones appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/developmental-milestones/…

The Blatant Signs Of Deadly Snoring

A lot of people snore. As a matter of fact, a big percentage of the American population snores.

An estimated 40% of adults in the U.S. snore. And, men, you tend to out-snore women. (Yes, this may explain why you get kicked or shoved at night!)

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Contrary to what other people think that snoring is a sign of deep sleep, it’s not.

And despite the myth that snoring is a sign of deep sleep, there’s really no upside to it.

“Snoring really does not demonstrate anything good, ” says Erich Voigt, an ear, nose, and throat doctor and sleep specialist at New York University Langone Health. “You can have beautifully deep sleep in a silent sleep.”

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Snoring can be a sign of a more serious health condition but that doesn’t mean everybody who snores is in trouble. There are some cases where snoring is harmless. Nonetheless, there are some cases where snoring is an indication of something more serious.

Snoring is never great news, but often it’s harmless (other than the pain your sleeping partner may feel). In some cases, though, it’s a sign of something serious.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Snoring happens when the airways in the nose and in the mouth become narrow. With the airways obstructed, the tissues in the said areas end up vibrating.  That vibration contributes to the sound of a snore.

When we sleep, if the air that moves through our nose and mouth has a clear passage, we can sleep silently. But when the airways are narrowed, we snore.

“Snoring is basically a vibration of the tissues inside of the airway,” Voigt explains — that is, the roof of the mouth and the vertical folds of tissue that surround the tonsils.

(Via: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/04/22/714249236/beyond-annoying-how-to-identify-the-sounds-of-a-troublesome-snore)

Alcohol intake is one of the many reasons why people snore. If alcohol intake is limited, it can lessen the snoring. That just shows that snoring can be controlled and treated.

A lot of factors can contribute to snoring, says Voigt. We can control some of the underlying triggers. For instance, drinking alcohol