Orexin/Hypocretin Agonists are Coming! Part I: Reporting Back from World Sleep 2019

Room 116: A Glimpse of the Future

It was a basic, boring conference room, but there was nothing basic or boring about Room 116 at the Vancouver Convention Center on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. As the final session of the final of five days of the World Sleep Congress including World Narcolepsy Day, I felt wobbly and cataplectic, but I couldn’t go home, not yet.

At exactly 4:30 p.m., I eagerly stepped into Room 116 to join narcolepsy experts, drug developers and other patient advocates for a look into the future. 

This final session, simply titled “Narcolepsy” – included researchers sharing important new results related to novel and upcoming narcolepsy therapies. In July 2018, I reported here on the unprecedented amount of drug development underway for narcolepsy. Since then, the FDA has made three important approvals and more drug development continues on, full-steam ahead!

So it’s time for an update. Part I will catch you up to speed on orexin/hypocretin agonists, and Part II will share many more exciting developments. 

Dr. Todd Swick shares his excitement for new drugs to treat narcolepsy:

Watch this video on YouTube.

Advancing Orexin-Related Therapies

Since 1999, we’ve known that type 1 narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a selective loss of neurons producing the neuropeptide orexin (or hypocretin), which plays a central role in maintaining wakefulness. However, finding compounds able to cross the blood-brain barrier and mimic the function of orexin has been scientifically challenging. Over the past 20 years, a few approaches have been explored, but promising research started coming out of Japan a few years ago with Takeda Pharmaceuticals. 

So when Dr. Rebecca Evans took the stage in Room 116 to present Takeda’s first-in-human clinical trial findings for the orexin 2 receptor selective agonist, TAK-925, the excitement was palpable. I felt honored to be in the room as these outcomes were shared publicly for the first time here. 

TAK-925

  • Background: In 2017, a patent for orexin 2 receptor selective agonists, including the clinical candidate TAK-925 was claimed. In April 2018, the orexin 2 receptor-selective agonist, TAK-925, was

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review Issues Blog Post On Humidifiers And Snore RX For Snorers

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review has announced that they have published a new blog post on how humidifiers and snoring mouthpieces like SnoreRX can help snorers. The blog post is titled, “Humidifier: A Great Gift Even For A Snorer,” and explains why a humidifier can be a great gift idea for a friend or family member who snores. By introducing a moderate amount of moisture into the air, a humidifier can help the snorer relax and have a sound sleep that prevents snoring.

Steve Walker, author of the blog post, says, “A humidifier does more than just provide a spa-like ambiance to a room. It’s actually pretty useful to have a humidifier especially during the winter season.”

He adds, “It’s a practical gift because of the many uses of this particular electronic device. Aside from adding moisture in the air, the humidifier can also help relieve symptoms of different allergies, prevent dry skin, prevent babies from falling sick, and prevent snoring.”

According to the article, the moist air provided by the humidifier soothes the tissues at the back of the throat. The humidifier keeps the throat moist and this prevents irritation that is connected with snoring. Overall, humidifiers offer substantial benefits not only for the health of people but also for belongings and the atmosphere. When a humidifier is installed in the home, it not only helps strengthen the immune system, but it also decreases the incidence of nose bleeds by ensuring that the mucous membrane in the nose is moist.

Meanwhile, aside from the humidifiers, snoring can be prevented by snoring mouthpieces that have been well reviewed by The Snoring Mouthpiece Review. One example is the SnoreRX. The SnoreRX is FDA cleared and what makes it distinctive is the “MicroFit” feature. This allows the adjustment of the position of the lower jaw for maximize the person’s comfort and effectiveness.

However, the SnoreRX will have to be customized for each particular user through boil-and-bite technology. This means that it will have to be submerged in boiling water for approximately 18 seconds. The person who will use it will then clamp on …

Taking a “Sick Day” with Narcolepsy

When working in traditional offices, I struggled with “sick days.”

I didn’t often get colds or flus. I just dealt with my narcolepsy with cataplexy, which was fairly stable and “well-managed” by the time I took these jobs.

Yet narcolepsy was still with me every day, to varying degrees — from minor annoyance to extreme discomfort — sprinkled over moments, minutes or hours.

I rarely felt fully “healthy” OR fully “sick” — like bed-ridden, throwing up, or contagious — things deemed worthy of sick days. My more invisible and consistent adversity was hard to measure, hard to explain to a supervisor & hard to decide for myself when to say “Nope, not today.”

I eventually got better at this though and realized I didn’t need to explain myself. I could say “I’m not feeling well enough to work today,” and walk away to do some self-care. (Read here about getting a nap space.)

For the past 1.5 years, I’ve had my dream job working for Project Sleep. Now, I make my own schedule, work at my own pace and do NOT commute three hours a day across Los Angeles.

Interestingly, now that my work is my passion, taking a day off means putting off something I feel strongly about, or delaying something where I feel my “timeliness” reflects upon my leadership skills or my nonprofit’s consistency.

However, by the end of World Sleep, I was zombie-esque and feeling down. Which I realize sounds odd because I had TONS to be happy about after a successful inaugural World Narcolepsy DayWorld Sleep Congress 2019 in Vancouver, Canada. However, I was so depleted & indifferent on my route home on Thursday, I recognized that I needed another full day off.

Yesterday, I unpacked and made a big batch of minestrone soup. I bought three kinds of ice cream and four bunches of flowers and eucalyptus to fill my apartment. I watched YouTube aimlessly, walked lots and lay with my legs up the wall to bring down inflammation in my ankles.

Last night, I started doing my work in my …

Oventus Medical: The War on Snoring, Spousal Homicide and the Mouth Guard that Caught Alan Moss’ Eye

The Health Kick Podcast with Tim Boreham chats with Chris Hart, founder, managing director and CEO of Oventus Medical.

The company’s key focus is its range of medical devices that improve comfort during sleeping for patients suffering from various ailments including sleep apnoea and snoring, as well as secondary effects such as tooth decay and gum disease.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/oventus-medical-the-war-on-snoring/…

Keep Your Toddler From Leaving Their Room

Rather read than watch? Click here.

Philips Consumer Sleep Products Suite Aims to “Address 80% of All Sleep Issues”

Revealed at the CES tradeshow in January 2019, Philips expanded SmartSleep suite of consumer-facing sleep solutions is now available in the United States. The products address sleep issues such as difficulty falling asleep, snoring, and simply not getting enough quality sleep. By expanding its suite of consumer sleep solutions, Philips states that its aim is to ultimately address 80% of all sleep issues globally.

“Everyone sleeps, but unfortunately sleep doesn’t come easily for everyone. There are a host of issues that impact sleep—from trouble falling asleep to snoring to chronic conditions like sleep apnea,” says Mark Michels, business leader, Healthy Sleep Solutions at Philips, in a release. “Using our nearly 40 years of deep clinical expertise in sleep technology, we continue to enhance the solutions available for people who experience common issues that negatively impact the quality of their sleep. Our suite of solutions aims to provide consumers with access to clinically backed innovations that will help them get a better night’s sleep to achieve more productive days ahead, while also increasing awareness to the importance of sleep health. All of this comes with the hope of positively impacting the consumer and clinical sleep industries alike.”

Philips SmartSleep suite of solutions is comprised of a mix of existing and new solutions, which aim to make better sleep accessible to everyone:

  • SmartSleep Analyzer: It provides personalized analysis of users’ sleep based on an online questionnaire to identify sleep challenges and recommend sleep solutions personalized to the user. This triage tool was developed in collaboration with sleep physicians, specialists, and researchers to identify the most common sleep challenges, helping to support Philips strategy to amplify awareness around the role sleep plays in consumers’ health and wellbeing.
  • SmartSleep Snoring Relief Band: This wearable device is a personalized solution for positional snoring. Derived from clinical technology, a small, discreet positional monitor detects when the wearer begins to shift to their back and delivers adaptive vibrations that prompt them to sleep on their side.
  • SmartSleep Better Sleep Program: Rooted in the principals of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), the SmartSleep Better Sleep Program combines

Sleep as a Vital Sign: Kristina Weaver, EMT-P, RPSGT

Kristina Weaver, EMT-P, RPSGT, ensures medical center colleagues across all specialties play the sleep advocate.

By Greg Thompson | Photography by Dani Nichol Photography

”KristinaWeaverSleepCenter”

Kristina Weaver, EMT-P, RPSGT, cares deeply about her patients, but she’d rather not see them back at Parrish Healthcare. As director of Care Navigation for the Sleep Navigator/Educator Program at the Titusville, Fla, health system, Weaver has managed a 30% reduction in readmissions for newly identified sleep apnea patients over the last four years,1 a result of healthier patients with positive outcomes.

The improvement comes courtesy of what Weaver calls a more person-centered approach, with screening and education throughout the continuum of care. A person-centered approach gets patients actively involved in their own care, helping them take ownership of their treatment.

“If you have sleep apnea, you cannot effectively treat other comorbid conditions,” Weaver explains. “Take heart failure as an example. When a patient comes into the hospital with left ventricular heart failure and [has] untreated sleep apnea, that left ventricle has to work even harder because it lacks oxygen due to the sleep apnea. Getting that patient to understand how those things work together, and want to fix the problem for themselves, is vital.”

Before Parrish Healthcare started its Sleep Navigator program, many colleagues in the hospital did not even know an on-site sleep center existed. But now, according to Weaver, the mindset throughout the various subspecialties has dramatically changed. “Now when a heart attack patient comes into the [emergency room] who complains of chest pain, or complains of fatigue and poor sleep, they immediately think of sleep medicine,” she says. “In the past, the two and two may not have been put together. No matter if it’s in our diabetes support group, pulmonary rehab, physician practice—anywhere in our network—we treat sleep as a vital sign.”

Sleep Support Group

”WeaverOchoa”

Once patients get treatment for their sleep apnea, they are often referred to the sleep support group, dubbed “Brevard A.W.A.K.E (Alert, Well and Keeping Energetic).” Of course, in this context, Weaver wants to see her patients again.

The group often attracts 40 to 50 people

Snoring Nose No Limits: UAB Experts Advise How to Cut Noisome Snoring

Kirk P. Withrow, MD, shares some causes and solutions to snoring.

While the nose generally is not the direct source of the tissue vibration, nasal obstruction – like that from congestion due to cold or allergy – can play a role in snoring. This contributes to snoring due primarily to the change in position of the structures in the throat that occurs with mouth breathing, namely displacement of the tissue toward the back wall of the throat.

“Alleviating nasal obstruction and transitioning away from mouth breathing can improve or eliminate snoring,” Withrow said. “Such treatment can include allergy management or surgery to correct structural defects in the nose.”

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/snoring-nose-no-limits-uab-experts-advise-how-to-cut-noisome-snoring/…

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review Publishes Post On Z Quiet, A Device Designed To Prevent Snoring And Its Complications

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, which is based in Long Beach, California, has published a new blog post that discusses the causes and complications of snoring and its possible solutions. The blog post is titled, “Snoring: Causes And Complications Of It.” The article points out that it is heavy snoring that people should worry about because something more serious could be going on, such as sleep apnea.

Steve Walker, author of the article, says, “The vibrating nasal tissue is what causes the snoring sound. The more it vibrates, the louder the sound. There are various causes of snoring. In general, it is due to the tissues and muscles in the airway that tend to collapse and block the airway while a person is asleep. But what is more important to know are the potential complications of heavy snoring, such as high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, and even falling asleep while driving.”

Vibrating nasal tissue is the main reason for the snoring sound. This is caused by the relaxed throat or nasal tissues through which the air goes through while a person is sleeping. When these tissues obstruct the airway, this reduces the amount of air going through the airway or the tissues may totally obstruct air flow so that the body is momentarily without air. Another possible cause of snoring is a genetic anatomic obstruction like large tonsils, a deviated septum, a large neck circumference, and a floppy soft palate.

Snoring begins to have complications when it interferes with the snorer’s breathing while sleeping and/or when it interrupts the bed partner’s ability to get sufficient restful sleep. When the snorer stops breathing while sleeping, this means that the oxygen level for that person decreases and he or she may awaken choking and gasping for air. This prevents the person from getting a good night’s sleep. And those momentary deficiency in oxygen may result into other more serious conditions, such as hypertension, stroke, and heart disease.

Naturally, it would be best for people who notice that they have possible symptoms of sleep apnea to consult with a doctor. And there are …

New Snoring Mouthpieces Review Blog Post Offers Advice To People Suffering From Exhaustion

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, which is based in Long Beach, California, has published a new blog post that offers advice to people suffering from exhaustion when they wake up in the morning. The article is titled, “Are You Exhausted When You Wake Up In The Morning?” It presents some remedies for people who feel exhausted even after waking up in the morning. It is pointed out that the primary reason is that the person is not getting enough sleep and that it could be even be related to a more serious condition, which is sleep apnea.

Steve Walker, a spokesperson for The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, says, “Sleep apnea actually causes you to stop breathing while sleeping. Your airway gets blocked as your muscles relax during sleep with the result that little to no air gets to your lungs. So, even if you think you’ve slept long enough, you still feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning. This sleep disorder is also the reason why you snore so loud.”

Steve continues, “The condition is indicated by loud snoring that is usually followed by choking noises. And if the brain detects that insufficient oxygen is getting into the body, the person instinctively wakes up to be able to breathe again and this may happen several times during the night. No wonder, you feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning.”

It should be noted that loud snoring does not necessarily mean that a person suffers from sleep apnea. It is loud snoring that is followed by choking or gasping sounds, or silent pauses may likely indicate sleep apnea. It often results into sleep deprivation, which is indicated in the morning as fatigue, unintentional napping, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, and irritability. Other common symptoms include insomnia, feeling tired even after having a full night’s sleep, headaches and migraines, reduced sex drive, nocturia, and loss of memory.

Meanwhile, a solution for snoring is the Good Morning Snore Solution (GMSS). This is a snoring mouthpiece that helps people manage their snoring. It is a Tongue Stabilizing Device (TSD) mouthpiece that is unique …