Picking Your Battles

As Kenny Rogers so famously put it, “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em and know when to fold ’em,” and that’s never so true as it is when you’re dealing with a young child. If you were to stand firm every time you and your little one disagreed, you would spend almost all of your time arguing. And even though the hills worth defending will be different for every family, I’ve got some suggestions today to help you evaluate where you might want to give up some ground in exchange for a little peace and serenity.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

I’m A CPAP Dropout: Why Many Lose Sleep Over Apnea Treatment

When doctors told Frances Faulkenburg she had sleep apnea, she was more than ready for relief from her tired-all-the-time existence. She used to fall asleep at red lights while behind the wheel. At night, she’d wake up gasping for air, heart pounding. Her husband told her she snored.

But Faulkenburg, 47, couldn’t tolerate the CPAP machine her doctor prescribed.

“I just could not get used to the face mask covering both my nose and mouth,” said Faulkenburg, who lives in Oviedo, Fla.

“It was claustrophobic.”

CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure, is often one of the first solutions doctors suggest for sleep apnea. With this disorder, a person’s breathing stops and starts so frequently during the night that it can lead to or exacerbate health problems. The National Sleep Foundation estimates that more than 18 million American adults have sleep apnea.

A CPAP machine blows a stream of air into the back of the throat to let people breathe easier. It prevents muscles in the back of the throat from narrowing, which can constrict the airway, causing snoring or disturbed sleep.

Yet Faulkenburg quit using her CPAP and went back to feeling sleepy and tired all the time.

Many people have a negative reaction to the machines and are tempted to do the same. The big whoosh of air in your throat. The restrictive mask on your face. It can be a lot to adjust to. Studies suggest that from one-third to more than 50% of patients either stop using their CPAP machine or never bother to fill their prescription. They quit for a variety of reasons, but mostly because the device can be cumbersome and uncomfortable. Sometimes, they quit because of confusing or stringent health insurance restrictions.

But the health effects of untreated sleep apnea can be serious. People struggle with anxiety, tiredness and low productivity. There’s even an increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.

Mary Mertens, a respiratory therapist at the Cleveland Clinic, helps patients work through problems with their CPAP machine. Patients often complain that the volume

Reasons Why Being A Night Person Is Not Good For Your Health

Many things can keep us up at night. It can be work that you took home as an assignment because your boss insists on having it done by morning. It can also be insomnia or a medical condition like anxiety. It can also be that you are doing a movie marathon on Netflix. Or maybe, you just like to be up at night and not during daylight. Whichever it is, it’s nowhere near good. This is so because studies have shown that the relationship with improper sleep-wake cycle and health issues are direct.

 

You’ll be at risk for higher blood pressure. You don’t have it in the family. You eat healthy meals. Therefore don’t let being a night owl break the chain.

In a 2013 study in the journal Chronobiology International, researchers found that “evening types” were  than “morning types” to have , even after they controlled for participants’ total amount of sleep and sleep quality.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513065#513065)

 

You’ll have less time for exercise. Sleep is important. So is exercise. Don’t lose both.

Self-described night owls  than people who consider themselves early birds, according to a 2014 research abstract in the journal Sleep; they also report having more difficulty finding time to exercise and maintaining a regular exercise schedule.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513071#513071)

 

You’re more likely to gain weight. Unless you want that, then this probably won’t be a problem.

Some experts believe that  disrupts the body’s natural overnight fasting period, which can interfere with its ability to burn fat. Night owls also happen to  per day than early birds, according to a 2011 study in the journal Obesity–248 more, on average–perhaps because willpower is lower when you’re tired and we  late at night.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513077#513077)

 

You’re more at risk for diabetes type 2.

In one 2015 study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, men with evening chronotypes were more likely to have  (a condition in which the body loses muscle mass), compared to men with morning chronotypes.

Female night owls, compared with their early bird counterparts, tended to have more belly

New TV Show Is Looking for Britain’s Loudest Snorers Whose Long-suffering Partners Have Had Enough

The Sun reports that an ad for the unnamed show—which is being produced by Firecracker Films—read: “Is your partner’s snoring ruining your life?”

“Firecracker Films is making an exciting new show for a major terrestrial broadcaster and we’re looking for some of Britain’s biggest and loudest snorers.

“We want to hear from fed-up partners who’ve simply had enough.”

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/10/new-tv-show-is-looking-for-britains-loudest-snorers-whose-long-suffering-partners-have-had-enough/…

Researchers ID Sleep-disordered Phenotypes in Infants

New research has examined the impact of an infant’s sleep duration and sleep disruption due to sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) on cognitive and language development at two years of age. A separate study has identified 4 distinct types of SDB that occur in infants, along with unique risk factors associated with each.

The findings, published in two papers in the August 2018 issue of Sleep Medicine, will help doctors better predict which children are at risk for sleep disorders and intervene early with treatment.

Piush Mandhane, MD, PhD, FRCPC, an associate professor of pediatrics in the University of Alberta’s (U of A) Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, and leader of the CHILD Study’s Edmonton site, led both studies.

“Short sleep duration and symptoms of SDB ranging from snoring to sleep apnea have been associated with multiple health, learning, and behavioral problems in children,” says Mandhane in a release. “In the CHILD Study, we were interested to find out if limited sleep time and sleep disruption affected cognitive and language development in preschool children.”

Importance of Total and Nighttime Sleep

In the first study, CHILD researchers found that infants who regularly sleep less than 12 hours total over any given 24-hour period have poorer cognitive and language development at 2 years of age than infants who get more sleep. They also found that nighttime sleep had a greater impact on cognitive and language development compared to daytime sleep, and a short nighttime sleep was associated with a 10.1-point decrease in cognitive development using a standardized test of mental and motor development.

“A drop of 10 points represents nearly a full standard deviation on the cognitive scale,” Mandhane explains. “It’s quite a substantial difference.”

The researchers further found that children with persistent SDB had lower language scores, but no differences in cognitive development compared to children with no SDB. There are a few possible explanations for this finding, according to the study first-author Lisa Smithson, a postdoctoral researcher at the U of A.

“One theory is that language acquisition is more sensitive to sleep disruption than cognitive development. Alternatively, the link

Science Approved Ways To Fall Asleep Easier

Sleep is a crucial form of rest for the whole body. Everyone needs it. But sometimes, not everyone gets it. Other than staying up for long purposely because of work or other activities, one can’t go to sleep simply because he or she has insomnia. Insomnia can be caused by a number of factors. The most commons ones are medications or medical conditions that disturb the sleep cycle. But if you’re not under any of these, then what’s been keeping you up may be anxiety.

Unless certain medical conditions or medications are the cause of your sleeplessness, the most common culprit is anxiety, says Lisa Meltzer, an education scholar for the National Sleep Foundation and associate professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in Denver.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Anxiety makes you too aware of your surroundings. Which makes sense. The unease, worry or fear can sometimes keep you up more than caffeine ever could. If you are having a hard time relaxing, these evidence-based ways to fall asleep easier can help you.

 

Compel yourself to stay awake.

Is there anything reverse psychology isn’t good for? In this case, it may alleviate excessive sleep anxiety. A small study conducted at the University of Glasgow found that sleep-onset insomniacs who were instructed to lay in bed and try to stay awake with their eyes open fell asleep quicker than participants told to fall asleep without this “paradoxical intention” (PI). Participants in the PI group fell asleep easier and showed less sleep performance anxiety.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Get your hands and brain working by doing something for 10 minutes.

“This is a stimulus control theory,” says Meltzer. “Everything in life has a stimulus value, even your bed,” meaning your body should recognize that lying in bed means it’s time to go to sleep. To give your bed that value, the only things you should be doing in it are sleep and sex, she explains. “Getting out of bed if you can’t sleep is the hardest one to do, but it’s so important. If you’re spending 10 hours in bed, but

The Curse of the Short Nap

Tell me if this sounds familiar. Your baby is yawning and rubbing her eyes, clearly ready for a prolonged daytime snooze, so you put her down in her crib, turn out the light and she dozes off, only to wake up again 45 minutes later, refusing to go back to sleep.

This is such a common occurrence, I’ve named it, “The Curse of the Short Nap.” In today’s video, I’ll explain why the 30-45 minute mark is such a predictable wake-up point for babies, and tell you how you can help them to get the long, restful naps they need.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

The Benefits of Boundaries

It’s a bit of a mixed blessing when our little ones hit the toddler years. This is the time when they’re really starting to develop their own personalities and characteristics, and all of the cuteness that comes along with it.

But that’s also the time when they start questioning what happens if they don’t follow the rules, and if you’re not careful, your once peaceful household can suddenly feel like it’s being run by your child.

The surprising truth is that toddlers don’t test those boundaries hoping for more freedom and independence. In fact, it’s just the opposite!

I’ll explain what I mean in this week’s video.


Rather read than watch? Click here.

Are you tired of butting heads with your little ones? Looking for a better way of resolving conflict with them? I’ve got just the thing!

Kids:The Manual is filled with simple, step-by-step solutions to the problems that parents face with their children’s behavior. End the frustration for both you and your child, and discover the surprisingly easy path to a conflict-free relationship with your kids!

The post The Benefits of Boundaries appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/the-benefits-of-boundaries/…

Italian Researcher Says Sleep-Breathing Screenings Should Be Required for Truckers

A survey of 905 Italian truck drivers has shown that approximately half have at least one sleep-related breathing problem that potentially can cause drivers to fall asleep at the wheel.

In a presentation at the European Respiratory Society International Congress entitled”Obstructive sleep apnoea screening the truck driver population,” Luca Roberti, president of Apnoici Italiani (the Italian Sleep Apnoea Patient Association), called for it to be made compulsory for European haulage companies to test drivers for sleep-related breathing problems.

“Considering that drivers are in charge of transport vehicles weighing several tons, companies have a great moral and civic responsibility to ensure their employees are safe to drive and are not at risk of suddenly falling asleep at the wheel. This would also be in line with European Union legislation that regulates the renewal of drivers’ licenses for people suffering from obstructive sleep apnea,” he said.

The European Union Directive 2014/85/EU, created to limit accidents arising from OSA, requires drivers with moderate or severe OSA to seek medical advice before their licenses can be issued or renewed; drivers may be advised not to drive until confirmation of a diagnosis and steps are taken to control the condition. One of the main risk factors for OSA is being overweight.

Roberti and colleagues conducted their study in 2018 after being asked by an Italian truck driver cooperative, Federtrasporti, to carry out a health survey of truck drivers. On 44 days between March and December, volunteer expert patients, doctors, and nurses questioned drivers at truck dealerships, 50 companies that were part of Federtrasporti, at driver training days and at a truck driver show.

They measured height, weight, and waist circumference, took details of medical conditions, such as diabetes, and of lifestyle factors, such as whether the drivers smoked or took drugs. They asked about their length of time as a haulier, distances covered, whether they drove national or international routes, and the types of goods they transported. Their questions about sleep included:

  • do you sometimes stop breathing and have sleep apnea at night?
  • do you snore?
  • do you wake up needing to urinate urgently?
  • are

Why Hire a Sleep Consultant?

With all of the free information available online, not to mention from friends and family members, what can a sleep consultant offer you that you can’t get yourself?

Truth be told, if a book or a website works to get your little one sleeping through the night, you might not need the personal attention and customized solutions that a consultant can offer. But if you’re struggling to get the sleep you and your baby need, they can make all the difference in the world. I’ll explain how in this week’s video.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,000 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Why Hire a Sleep Consultant? appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/why-hire-a-sleep-consultant/…