Keep Your Toddler From Leaving Their Room

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Philips Consumer Sleep Products Suite Aims to “Address 80% of All Sleep Issues”

Revealed at the CES tradeshow in January 2019, Philips expanded SmartSleep suite of consumer-facing sleep solutions is now available in the United States. The products address sleep issues such as difficulty falling asleep, snoring, and simply not getting enough quality sleep. By expanding its suite of consumer sleep solutions, Philips states that its aim is to ultimately address 80% of all sleep issues globally.

“Everyone sleeps, but unfortunately sleep doesn’t come easily for everyone. There are a host of issues that impact sleep—from trouble falling asleep to snoring to chronic conditions like sleep apnea,” says Mark Michels, business leader, Healthy Sleep Solutions at Philips, in a release. “Using our nearly 40 years of deep clinical expertise in sleep technology, we continue to enhance the solutions available for people who experience common issues that negatively impact the quality of their sleep. Our suite of solutions aims to provide consumers with access to clinically backed innovations that will help them get a better night’s sleep to achieve more productive days ahead, while also increasing awareness to the importance of sleep health. All of this comes with the hope of positively impacting the consumer and clinical sleep industries alike.”

Philips SmartSleep suite of solutions is comprised of a mix of existing and new solutions, which aim to make better sleep accessible to everyone:

  • SmartSleep Analyzer: It provides personalized analysis of users’ sleep based on an online questionnaire to identify sleep challenges and recommend sleep solutions personalized to the user. This triage tool was developed in collaboration with sleep physicians, specialists, and researchers to identify the most common sleep challenges, helping to support Philips strategy to amplify awareness around the role sleep plays in consumers’ health and wellbeing.
  • SmartSleep Snoring Relief Band: This wearable device is a personalized solution for positional snoring. Derived from clinical technology, a small, discreet positional monitor detects when the wearer begins to shift to their back and delivers adaptive vibrations that prompt them to sleep on their side.
  • SmartSleep Better Sleep Program: Rooted in the principals of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), the SmartSleep Better Sleep Program combines

Sleep as a Vital Sign: Kristina Weaver, EMT-P, RPSGT

Kristina Weaver, EMT-P, RPSGT, ensures medical center colleagues across all specialties play the sleep advocate.

By Greg Thompson | Photography by Dani Nichol Photography

”KristinaWeaverSleepCenter”

Kristina Weaver, EMT-P, RPSGT, cares deeply about her patients, but she’d rather not see them back at Parrish Healthcare. As director of Care Navigation for the Sleep Navigator/Educator Program at the Titusville, Fla, health system, Weaver has managed a 30% reduction in readmissions for newly identified sleep apnea patients over the last four years,1 a result of healthier patients with positive outcomes.

The improvement comes courtesy of what Weaver calls a more person-centered approach, with screening and education throughout the continuum of care. A person-centered approach gets patients actively involved in their own care, helping them take ownership of their treatment.

“If you have sleep apnea, you cannot effectively treat other comorbid conditions,” Weaver explains. “Take heart failure as an example. When a patient comes into the hospital with left ventricular heart failure and [has] untreated sleep apnea, that left ventricle has to work even harder because it lacks oxygen due to the sleep apnea. Getting that patient to understand how those things work together, and want to fix the problem for themselves, is vital.”

Before Parrish Healthcare started its Sleep Navigator program, many colleagues in the hospital did not even know an on-site sleep center existed. But now, according to Weaver, the mindset throughout the various subspecialties has dramatically changed. “Now when a heart attack patient comes into the [emergency room] who complains of chest pain, or complains of fatigue and poor sleep, they immediately think of sleep medicine,” she says. “In the past, the two and two may not have been put together. No matter if it’s in our diabetes support group, pulmonary rehab, physician practice—anywhere in our network—we treat sleep as a vital sign.”

Sleep Support Group

”WeaverOchoa”

Once patients get treatment for their sleep apnea, they are often referred to the sleep support group, dubbed “Brevard A.W.A.K.E (Alert, Well and Keeping Energetic).” Of course, in this context, Weaver wants to see her patients again.

The group often attracts 40 to 50 people

Snoring Nose No Limits: UAB Experts Advise How to Cut Noisome Snoring

Kirk P. Withrow, MD, shares some causes and solutions to snoring.

While the nose generally is not the direct source of the tissue vibration, nasal obstruction – like that from congestion due to cold or allergy – can play a role in snoring. This contributes to snoring due primarily to the change in position of the structures in the throat that occurs with mouth breathing, namely displacement of the tissue toward the back wall of the throat.

“Alleviating nasal obstruction and transitioning away from mouth breathing can improve or eliminate snoring,” Withrow said. “Such treatment can include allergy management or surgery to correct structural defects in the nose.”

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/snoring-nose-no-limits-uab-experts-advise-how-to-cut-noisome-snoring/…

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review Publishes Post On Z Quiet, A Device Designed To Prevent Snoring And Its Complications

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, which is based in Long Beach, California, has published a new blog post that discusses the causes and complications of snoring and its possible solutions. The blog post is titled, “Snoring: Causes And Complications Of It.” The article points out that it is heavy snoring that people should worry about because something more serious could be going on, such as sleep apnea.

Steve Walker, author of the article, says, “The vibrating nasal tissue is what causes the snoring sound. The more it vibrates, the louder the sound. There are various causes of snoring. In general, it is due to the tissues and muscles in the airway that tend to collapse and block the airway while a person is asleep. But what is more important to know are the potential complications of heavy snoring, such as high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, and even falling asleep while driving.”

Vibrating nasal tissue is the main reason for the snoring sound. This is caused by the relaxed throat or nasal tissues through which the air goes through while a person is sleeping. When these tissues obstruct the airway, this reduces the amount of air going through the airway or the tissues may totally obstruct air flow so that the body is momentarily without air. Another possible cause of snoring is a genetic anatomic obstruction like large tonsils, a deviated septum, a large neck circumference, and a floppy soft palate.

Snoring begins to have complications when it interferes with the snorer’s breathing while sleeping and/or when it interrupts the bed partner’s ability to get sufficient restful sleep. When the snorer stops breathing while sleeping, this means that the oxygen level for that person decreases and he or she may awaken choking and gasping for air. This prevents the person from getting a good night’s sleep. And those momentary deficiency in oxygen may result into other more serious conditions, such as hypertension, stroke, and heart disease.

Naturally, it would be best for people who notice that they have possible symptoms of sleep apnea to consult with a doctor. And there are …

New Snoring Mouthpieces Review Blog Post Offers Advice To People Suffering From Exhaustion

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, which is based in Long Beach, California, has published a new blog post that offers advice to people suffering from exhaustion when they wake up in the morning. The article is titled, “Are You Exhausted When You Wake Up In The Morning?” It presents some remedies for people who feel exhausted even after waking up in the morning. It is pointed out that the primary reason is that the person is not getting enough sleep and that it could be even be related to a more serious condition, which is sleep apnea.

Steve Walker, a spokesperson for The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, says, “Sleep apnea actually causes you to stop breathing while sleeping. Your airway gets blocked as your muscles relax during sleep with the result that little to no air gets to your lungs. So, even if you think you’ve slept long enough, you still feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning. This sleep disorder is also the reason why you snore so loud.”

Steve continues, “The condition is indicated by loud snoring that is usually followed by choking noises. And if the brain detects that insufficient oxygen is getting into the body, the person instinctively wakes up to be able to breathe again and this may happen several times during the night. No wonder, you feel exhausted when you wake up in the morning.”

It should be noted that loud snoring does not necessarily mean that a person suffers from sleep apnea. It is loud snoring that is followed by choking or gasping sounds, or silent pauses may likely indicate sleep apnea. It often results into sleep deprivation, which is indicated in the morning as fatigue, unintentional napping, difficulty concentrating, mood swings, and irritability. Other common symptoms include insomnia, feeling tired even after having a full night’s sleep, headaches and migraines, reduced sex drive, nocturia, and loss of memory.

Meanwhile, a solution for snoring is the Good Morning Snore Solution (GMSS). This is a snoring mouthpiece that helps people manage their snoring. It is a Tongue Stabilizing Device (TSD) mouthpiece that is unique …

It’s Almost World Narcolepsy Day, Are You Ready?

The week leading up to World Narcolepsy Day has quickly become one of the most surreal weeks of my life! Seeing posts, articles, videos and radio segments from around the globe honoring World Narcolepsy Day, wow!

World Narcolepsy Day Activities:

I will travel to Vancouver, Canada tomorrow to celebrate World Narcolepsy Day at World Sleep 2019, an international congress on sleep medicine. Join myself and Project Sleep virtually or in-person, here are some opportunities:

World Narcolepsy Day Pronouncement:

Tune in on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 at 12:00 noon ET for the World Narcolepsy Day Pronouncement – broadcasting via Facebook Live. Narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia experts and community leaders gathered at World Sleep 2019 will discuss the importance of World Narcolepsy Day, raising awareness and advancing research to improve outcomes for people with narcolepsy and IH around the world.

To watch the live broadcast, simply go to Project Sleep’s Facebook page on Sunday 9/22 at 12noon ET and as soon as we “go live,” the video should show up in our newsfeed!

World Narcolepsy Day #NChat on Twitter

#Nchat is a monthly Twitter conversation that connects people with narcolepsy worldwide. Join in this special #WorldNarcolepsyDay #Nchat on Sunday, Sept. 22nd at 5:00 p.m. ET!

If you’re in the Vancouver area or attending World Sleep 2019, join us in-person for these opportunities:

  • World Narcolepsy Day “Selfie-Station” on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. PT in the Public Foyer, Vancouver Convention Center
  • Julie Flygare’s Author Table on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 from 12:15 – 12:45 p.m. PT in the Public Foyer, Vancouver Convention Center
  • Inaugural World Narcolepsy Day Forum on Sunday, Sept. 22, 2019 from 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. PT in Room 109, Vancouver Convention Center
    • Speakers: Matt O’Neill, Narcolepsy UK, Julie Flygare, JD, Project Sleep, Claire Crisp, Wake Up Narcolepsy, Eveline Honig, MD, Narcolepsy Network, Rebecca King, Hypersomnia Foundation, Mark Patterson, MD, Day4Naps
    • Session description: To mark the inaugural World Narcolepsy Day, Sept 22, 2019, leaders of narcolepsy non-profit patient organizations will share programmatic highlights, best practices and key insights from the front lines. Clinicians, researchers and patient community members will learn about

Living One-Third of My Life with Narcolepsy

Twelve years ago today, I was diagnosed with a classic case of type 1 narcolepsy with cataplexy, just four days after my 24th birthday. So as of today, four days after my 36th birthday, I’ve now spent one-third of my life officially as a “person with narcolepsy” (not counting the years of symptoms before diagnosis).

For fun today, I searched my emails from that fateful day, Sept 18, 2007, and interestingly, I didn’t mention “narcolepsy” once via email that day, but I did send a lot of writing samples and cover letters for law firm job interviews… Interviews for fancy jobs I would never secure, and visions of “success” I would never realize.

“Futures have a way of falling down in mid-flight.” ~Veronica Shoffstall, After A While

It took a while for me to realize I wasn’t going to “get better and go back to my life as planned” after starting treatment. The emails to my dad proclaiming: “I HATE narcolepsy” started a few months later. For me, the hell of the next several years was a lifetime low.

“Innovation doesn’t happen because there’s some person who’s in some great circumstance and everything is going well and they get on a roll and they make something for the world. Innovation happens—art happens—because of suffering.” ~Claire Wineland, Klick MUSE New York

So here I stand, just four days away from the inaugural World Narcolepsy Day on Sept. 22, 2019. This week, I’m seeing posts from Japan, Australia, Brazil, Myanmar, Argentina, Spain, Finland, the UK, Ireland, and Israel. It’s totally surreal.

This is one of those moments that have made the past one-third of my life the richest years, with lessons learned about pushing beyond my comfort zone, letting go of other people’s expectations, standing up for what i believe in even when its not popular, and finding the courage to build my dream organization Project Sleep to align with like-minded people who want to disrupt the status quo and innovate for a brighter future.

No matter where you are, I want you to know that it is temporary and will not last forever. It’s …

Listen: Julie Flygare on Present Not Perfect Podcast in honor of World Narcolepsy Day

Two people with narcolepsy. Double the insight!

A few minutes into recording, I realized I’d never recorded a podcast with a fellow person with narcolepsy before. This interview with Leyla Sarper for the “Present Not Perfect” podcast was such a neat experience. I’m super excited to share this with you today!

Listen now on Spotify here. Also available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts and more! Just search “Present Not Perfect.”

What did we discuss?

  • being present,
  • letting go of self-guilt,
  • what is sleepiness?
  • coping with invisible illness,
  • Wide Awake and Dreaming: A Memoir of Narcolepsy,
  • cataplexy from Celine Dion,
  • nap rooms at work,
  • awesome dads,
  • building my “no” muscle,
  • learning the world doesn’t revolve around me,
  • re-arranging my life around my passions,
  • finding the courage to START, and
  • and of course, World Narcolepsy Day!!

To listen: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts and more! Just search “Present Not Perfect.”

I hope you will enjoy and share. Thank you for your support!

from Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-julie-flygare-on-present-not-perfect-podcast-in-honor-of-world-narcolepsy-day/…

Study Questions Routine Sleep Studies to Evaluate Snoring in Children

A new finding suggests that the pediatric sleep study, used to diagnose pediatric sleep apnea and to measure improvement after surgery, may be an unreliable predictor of who will benefit from having an adenotonsillectomy.

About 500,000 children under age 15 have adenotonsillectomies every year in the U.S. to treat obstructive sleep apnea. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends the surgery as a first-line therapy to treat the condition, which can cause behavioral issues, cardiovascular problems, poor growth, and developmental delays. The premise is that surgically removing or reducing the severity of the obstruction to the upper airway will improve sleep and reduce other problems caused by the disorder.

In 2012, the AAP recommended that pediatricians should screen children who snore regularly for sleep apnea, and refer children suspected of having the condition for an overnight in-laboratory sleep study. The group also recommended an adenotonsillectomy based on the results of the test. But results from the new UMSOM study, published in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics, call into question those recommendations because the data they analyzed found no relationship between improvements in sleep studies following surgery and resolution of most sleep apnea symptoms.

“Resolution of an airway obstruction measured by a sleep study performed after an adenotonsillectomy has long been thought to correlate with improvement in sleep apnea symptoms, but we found this may not be the case,” said study lead author Amal Isaiah, MD, PhD, an Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery and Pediatrics at UMSOM. “Our finding suggests that using sleep studies alone to manage sleep apnea in children may be a less than satisfactory way of determining whether surgery is warranted.”

Get the full story at sciencedaily.com. 

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/routine-sleep-studies-snoring-children/…