Listen Now: New Interview on Wake Up Narcolepsy’s Narcolepsy 360 Podcast

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of sitting down with Claire Crisp, Executive Director of Wake Up Narcolepsy (WUN), to record an interview for WUN’s Narcolepsy 360 podcast.

This was a meaningful experience and a lot fun to share this conversation with Claire, who is an amazing leader, advocate and friend in the narcolepsy community. We talked about our books, my personal experience with narcolepsy, and what drove me to found Project Sleep. I also shared some behind-the-scenes reflections on Project Sleep’s awareness and advocacy efforts along with some personal advice for others living with narcolepsy. 

Thank you to Claire, Elizabeth & the WUN team for including my story and Project Sleep’s efforts in this great podcast series. Listen now: https://www.wakeupnarcolepsy.org/get-involved/podcast/

from Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-new-interview-on-wake-up-narcolepsys-narcolepsy-360-podcast/…

Seattle! Speaking Sleep Advocacy and Narcolepsy Awareness

Seattle: I’m so excited to visit soon for three speaking engagements!

1.) Speaking Advocacy at the Hypersomnia Education Meeting

I’m extremely honored that the Hypersomnia Foundation has invited me to speak about Project Sleep’s Advocacy at their upcoming Hypersomnia Education Meeting on Saturday, June 29, 2019, taking place from 10am – 3pm at the Seattle Airport Marriott. This event features a lineup of terrific speakers including the always amazing Dr. David Rye!

My Presentation Description: Scientists are making progress, but more research is urgently needed to better understand and treat idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) and other serious  sleep conditions. What can we do as patient advocates to accelerate research? One important approach is through strategic advocacy efforts. In this presentation, Flygare will demystify the advocacy process, highlight recent sleep community successes, and empower attendees with simple steps to take action. Attendees will gain a better understanding of how each of our voices makes a difference in educating decision-makers and advancing research to improve outcomes for those living with sleep conditions including IH.

Learn more and register here: https://www.hypersomniafoundation.org/event/seattle-meeting-2019/

2.) Narcolepsy Presentation with Northwest Narcolepsy Support Group

On Sunday, June 30, 2019, at 11:00 a.m., I will share my inspiring narcolepsy presentation “When Dreams Leave the Night” with the Northwest Narcolepsy Support Group. Please join us for this event, I believe the exact location details are being worked out now, so visit the Northwest Narcolepsy Support Group website to keep up-to-date on the details of this event: www.northwestnarcolepsy.org

Presentation Description: In this presentation, Julie will share her personal journey from facing mysterious symptoms in law school through receiving a narcolepsy diagnosis and becoming an advocate and author.  After her presentation, Julie would be thrilled to hear more about your group’s experiences with narcolepsy, answer any questions, sign books and share awareness materials.

3.) Narcolepsy Presentation for the UW Medicine Sleep Conference 

Last but not least, on Tuesday, July 2nd, I will share my first-hand patient-perspective narcolepsy presentation with the University of Washington Medicine sleep fellows during their Sleep Conference. I love speaking with healthcare professionals and look forward to this …

6 Annoying Reasons Why Couples Are Sleeping In Separate Bedrooms

Have you heard of sleep divorce? Apparently, it’s the reason why more and more relationships are becoming stronger down under in Australia.

Thousands of Australian couples are sleeping in separate beds, with experts claiming that “sleep divorce” is making relationships and sex lives stronger.

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

According to research, sleeping in separate bedrooms is benefiting a lot of marriages.

Author and self-confessed “dedicated separate sleeper”, Jennifer Adams, says research showed more than 200,000 Australian couples were no sleeping in separate beds.

Adams, who wrote Sleeping Apart Not Falling Apart, said she and her husband had been happily married for 14 years despite sleeping in different bedrooms.

“Show me the stats of the divorced couples who shared a bed every night,” the 53-year-old told the Daily Mail.

“Sleeping in separate rooms does not mean the end of a relationship, it’s just a way of maintaining a relationship.

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

It seems kind of odd for a couple to sleep in separate bedrooms but that’s just because it’s the norm. However, the norm isn’t exactly the best thing to do especially when it comes to salvaging a relationship. Think about it.

Jennifer shares how sleep divorce can become more socially acceptable.

“Talking about it openly becomes more socially acceptable. You would be surprised at how many happy married couples out there already doing this.”

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

Sleep divorce might just be the best solution for couples who find it hard to get a good night’s rest beside each other. It’s a more peaceful alternative to fighting the next day because of lack of sleep.

There are six annoying reasons why couples are sleeping in separate bedrooms.

Fly-in-fly-out schedules, shift work, body heat, snoring, farting and blanket theft are all blamed for disrupting sleep, forcing more and more couples to spend bedtime apart.

(Via: https://www.perthnow.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/fifo-shift-work-snoring-and-farting-forcing-couples-into-sleep-divorce-and-slumber-in-separate-bedrooms-ng-b881165321z)

It’s funny that body heat, snoring, farting, and blanket theft are some of the annoying reasons why couples are sleeping in separate rooms. They may sound pretty petty but not when it comes to sleeping. Nothing is petty when it comes to getting a

Sleep Apnea: Why You Feel Tired After a Full Night of Sleep

CNET’s guide goes over the different types of sleep apnea, causes, risk factors, and symptoms to help people understand sleep apnea.

The most common symptom of sleep apnea is snoring, but snoring on its own isn’t always indicative of sleep apnea. Snoring followed by silent pauses, gasping or choking sounds is likely a sign of sleep apnea.

Because sleep apnea wakes you up frequently throughout the night (even if you don’t notice it), you can suffer from symptoms of sleep deprivation, such as daytime fatigue, difficulty concentrating, unintentional napping and irritability or mood swings.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/06/sleep-apnea-why-you-feel-tired-after-a-full-night-of-sleep/…

3 Tips for Nap Time Success

Once they’ve committed to a sleep coaching program, most parents tend to see results in their baby’s nighttime sleep in as little as two or three nights.

But when it comes to naps, things tend to move a whole lot slower.

There are a few reasons for this. The sun is out, there’s more environmental noise, and there’s just a lot more activity surrounding them during the day, which can all lead to poor-quality naps during the day.

And as you might have already figured out, lousy naps lead to overtiredness at bedtime, and overtiredness leads to bad nighttime sleep, which leads to bad naps the next day, and the whole cycle just perpetuates itself.

So today, I’ve got three great tips for you to solve those daytime sleep woes and get your baby taking long, restful naps during the day, which will work wonders in getting them out of the overtiredness trap and into a predictable, consistent sleep schedule.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

The 2019 MAD Mouthpiece Award Goes To ZQuiet

The winner is …ZQuiet. Yes! ZQuiet wins the award for being the best MAD mouthpiece for 2019. Awarded  by The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, ZQuiet tops a long list of MAD mouthpieces in the market.

As part of its commitment to offering unbiased, rigorous reviews of snoring cessation products such as mouthpieces, pillows, chin straps and software applications, The Snoring Mouthpiece Review has awarded the ZQuiet® its 2019 MAD Mouthpiece of the Year, beating out other rivals in the category.

(Via: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/snoring-mouthpiece-review-awards-zquiet-163000326.html)

MAD stands for Mandibular Advancement Device and it is one of the two categories of snoring mouthpieces. The second category is composed of the TSD or Tongue Stabilizing Devices.

Snoring mouthpieces are typically categorized in one of two ways: 1. MAD or Mandibular Advancement Device, and 2. TSD or Tongue Stabilizing Devices. The MAD category remains the most popular in the realm of anti snoring mouthpieces, with TSD devices quickly gaining ground thanks to the key star in the category, the Good Morning Snore Solution.

The MAD category features literally 15-20 other major mouthpiece manufacturers doing battle for snoring mouthpiece supremacy, so separating individual products can be tough for the inexperienced user.

(Via: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/snoring-mouthpiece-review-awards-zquiet-163000326.html)

What makes ZQuiet the best MAD snoring mouthpiece? According to Steve Walker of The Snoring Mouthpiece Review, the design of ZQuiet is what makes it stand out in the market.

“We truly believe that the ZQuiet, at least when it comes to Mandibular Adjustment Devices, is easily the best and most usable mouthpiece of 2019,” said Steve Walker, spokesman for The Snoring Mouthpiece Review. “Its design remains a really unique selling point, as it allows freedom of movement where many other MAD designs do not.”

One of the key drawbacks for many MAD users is that this style of mouthpiece tends to lock the jaw in position – a problem that can create many issues. As an example, some MAD mouthpieces do not allow you to breathe through your mouth, which is a problem for many snorers. Additionally, by freezing the jaw in place, many people can become subject to problems with the

Jacksonville is America’s Top Snoring City According To Study

Can you believe this? Jacksonville has more snorers than any other cities in the U.S. If you don’t believe it, take a look at this.

When it comes to snoring, no other U.S. city tops Jacksonville.

That’s according to a recent study by Withings, which makes products that measure health, such as activity-tracking watches, scales and health monitors.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

One thing is for sure. Jacksonville is one noisy city. You might be wondering how the study was able to come up with such conclusion. Here’s how it was done.

Using data from health tracking devices, Withings found the users tracked in Jacksonville snore over five times a night with snore durations reaching one hour, 12 minutes.

By comparison, the national average for snoring was 2.65 times a night.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

Here’s what they found.

Withings also found the Jacksonville people tracked in the study stayed up later than most of the nation, putting the city in the top five for night owls.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

While Jacksonville tops the snoring category, it’s not exactly the city where you will find the late sleepers. Although it’s in the top 5 late night cities, it’s number 5.

Top Late-Night Cities: Cities with the Latest Average Bedtimes
1.) Philadelphia – 12:40 a.m.
2.) New York City – 12:36 a.m.
3.) Los Angeles – 12:30 a.m.
4.) Miami – 12:28 a.m.
5.) Jacksonville – 12:24 a.m.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

The study also shows that the person’s BMI or the body mass index has a lot to do with snoring.

Withings’ data showed a significant correlation between a person’s body mass index (BMI) and snoring in both men and women. The higher the BMI, the more likely a person is to be a heavy snorer.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

According to the study, men are more likely to snore heavily than women.

Withings found men were two times more likely to be heavy snorers than women.

(Via: https://news.wjct.org/post/study-finds-jacksonville-nation-s-1-city-snoring-and-top-5-city-night-owls)

Snoring should not be taken lightly. There’s a good reason why.  Read on and find out.

Snoring and nighttime breathing disturbances can impact the

Opioids Are Not Sleep Aids—They Can Actually Worsen Sleep

Evidence that taking opioids will help people with chronic pain to sleep better is limited and of poor quality, according to an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and medics from the University of Warwick in partnership with Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.

Many people suffering from long-term chronic pain use opioids as a sleep aid to take away pain and stop their sleep being disrupted. However, a new study led by the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick with Warwick Medical School suggests that not enough research has been done to assess the benefits and risks of using painkillers for the purpose of improving sleep quality.

Their study, a systematic review of existing research on the effects of opioids on sleep, has been published in Sleep Medicine Reviews.

Sleep disruption is a particularly frequent issue for patients with chronic pain, with a vicious cycle building between bad nights and increased pain. Patients with chronic pain are often empirically prescribed opioids to reduce their pain enough to get a good night’s sleep, but there has been little investigation of whether this is a safe and effective intervention.

The researchers conducted a comprehensive systematic review of existing literature that examined the effects of opioids on sleep quality. As part of this, they conducted a meta-analysis of data from these studies, combining the results of 18 studies which were then narrowed down to 5 with comparable data.

They found that research on opioid effects on sleep quality was limited and of poor quality, often with potential publication bias and conflicts of interest, and rarely testing patients for sleep apnea prior to and during the study.

Patients reported a small improvement in sleep quality when using opioids but that was not consistent with results derived from sleep assessment technologies, such as the total time and the percentage of time in deep sleep, which did not show an improvement.

Certain studies reported calmer sleep with less movement but the examined articles frequently did not examine the wider effects of opioid therapy such as subsequent functioning during the day. Where they did, reports of sedation

Promoting Long, Restful Naps

I’ve worked with a lot of parents who are under the impression that, if their baby doesn’t sleep during the day, they’ll sleep better at night. After all, he’ll be so tired when bedtime rolls around that he’ll just conk out and sleep peacefully until late the next morning. Right?

Wrong! Naps are an essential part of your little one’s sleep schedule, and skipping them or moving them around will have a negative effect of baby’s nighttime sleep. In today’s video, I’ll explain why, and how you can help to ensure that your baby gets the long, restful daytime naps he needs.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

4 Surprising Reasons Why You Snore

Do you ever wonder why you snore? Are you one of those folks who think sheer exhaustion is the reason for snoring? Well, if you are; think again. Sheer exhaustion is not the cause of your snoring.

There are 4 surprising reasons why you snore. One of these surprising reasons is your weight.

No one likes to talk about their waistline, but it is something to remember when trying to cut down on snoring. According to the National Sleep Foundation, “Being overweight leads to poor muscle tone and increases the tissue around the neck and throat.” With regular physical activity and a balanced diet, these muscles will become stronger and snoring may begin to decrease.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Another probable cause of your snoring is your alcohol intake. Maybe it’s time to cut down on it.

Having a little too much to drink before bedtime can bring on snoring. Alcohol relaxes the throat muscles, therefore lowering defense against airway obstruction. If you are planning on drinking, consider having your glass of wine a few hours before bed or avoid consuming alcohol altogether.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Your sleeping position could also be the reason why you snore. Apparently, sleeping on your back can make you snore more.

Everyone has their preferred way of drifting off to dreamland, but these sleep patterns can cause snoring too. The Mayo Clinic states that sleeping on your back narrows the airways, causing snoring. An easy fix is to change your sleep style. Sleeping on your side or on your stomach may reduce the likelihood of snoring.

(Via: https://valleycentral.com/sponsored/spotlight/4-factors-that-contribute-to-snoring-and-simple-steps-for-a-good-nights-sleep)

Another cause of your snoring is that you could be suffering from a sleep disorder called sleep apnea. Unfortunately, snoring is a sign of sleep apnea. This is something that you should look into especially if your snoring is really loud and you wake up grasping for air.

Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder that causes you to stop breathing or gasp for air in the middle if the night. Loud snoring, feeling tired after a full night’s sleep, and gasping for air are some of