Science Approved Ways To Fall Asleep Easier

Sleep is a crucial form of rest for the whole body. Everyone needs it. But sometimes, not everyone gets it. Other than staying up for long purposely because of work or other activities, one can’t go to sleep simply because he or she has insomnia. Insomnia can be caused by a number of factors. The most commons ones are medications or medical conditions that disturb the sleep cycle. But if you’re not under any of these, then what’s been keeping you up may be anxiety.

Unless certain medical conditions or medications are the cause of your sleeplessness, the most common culprit is anxiety, says Lisa Meltzer, an education scholar for the National Sleep Foundation and associate professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in Denver.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Anxiety makes you too aware of your surroundings. Which makes sense. The unease, worry or fear can sometimes keep you up more than caffeine ever could. If you are having a hard time relaxing, these evidence-based ways to fall asleep easier can help you.

 

Compel yourself to stay awake.

Is there anything reverse psychology isn’t good for? In this case, it may alleviate excessive sleep anxiety. A small study conducted at the University of Glasgow found that sleep-onset insomniacs who were instructed to lay in bed and try to stay awake with their eyes open fell asleep quicker than participants told to fall asleep without this “paradoxical intention” (PI). Participants in the PI group fell asleep easier and showed less sleep performance anxiety.

(Via:https://www.huffpost.com/entry/15-ways-to-fall-asleep-faster_n_55dde3e7e4b04ae497054470)

 

Get your hands and brain working by doing something for 10 minutes.

“This is a stimulus control theory,” says Meltzer. “Everything in life has a stimulus value, even your bed,” meaning your body should recognize that lying in bed means it’s time to go to sleep. To give your bed that value, the only things you should be doing in it are sleep and sex, she explains. “Getting out of bed if you can’t sleep is the hardest one to do, but it’s so important. If you’re spending 10 hours in bed, but

The Curse of the Short Nap

Tell me if this sounds familiar. Your baby is yawning and rubbing her eyes, clearly ready for a prolonged daytime snooze, so you put her down in her crib, turn out the light and she dozes off, only to wake up again 45 minutes later, refusing to go back to sleep.

This is such a common occurrence, I’ve named it, “The Curse of the Short Nap.” In today’s video, I’ll explain why the 30-45 minute mark is such a predictable wake-up point for babies, and tell you how you can help them to get the long, restful naps they need.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

The Benefits of Boundaries

It’s a bit of a mixed blessing when our little ones hit the toddler years. This is the time when they’re really starting to develop their own personalities and characteristics, and all of the cuteness that comes along with it.

But that’s also the time when they start questioning what happens if they don’t follow the rules, and if you’re not careful, your once peaceful household can suddenly feel like it’s being run by your child.

The surprising truth is that toddlers don’t test those boundaries hoping for more freedom and independence. In fact, it’s just the opposite!

I’ll explain what I mean in this week’s video.


Rather read than watch? Click here.

Are you tired of butting heads with your little ones? Looking for a better way of resolving conflict with them? I’ve got just the thing!

Kids:The Manual is filled with simple, step-by-step solutions to the problems that parents face with their children’s behavior. End the frustration for both you and your child, and discover the surprisingly easy path to a conflict-free relationship with your kids!

The post The Benefits of Boundaries appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/the-benefits-of-boundaries/…

Italian Researcher Says Sleep-Breathing Screenings Should Be Required for Truckers

A survey of 905 Italian truck drivers has shown that approximately half have at least one sleep-related breathing problem that potentially can cause drivers to fall asleep at the wheel.

In a presentation at the European Respiratory Society International Congress entitled”Obstructive sleep apnoea screening the truck driver population,” Luca Roberti, president of Apnoici Italiani (the Italian Sleep Apnoea Patient Association), called for it to be made compulsory for European haulage companies to test drivers for sleep-related breathing problems.

“Considering that drivers are in charge of transport vehicles weighing several tons, companies have a great moral and civic responsibility to ensure their employees are safe to drive and are not at risk of suddenly falling asleep at the wheel. This would also be in line with European Union legislation that regulates the renewal of drivers’ licenses for people suffering from obstructive sleep apnea,” he said.

The European Union Directive 2014/85/EU, created to limit accidents arising from OSA, requires drivers with moderate or severe OSA to seek medical advice before their licenses can be issued or renewed; drivers may be advised not to drive until confirmation of a diagnosis and steps are taken to control the condition. One of the main risk factors for OSA is being overweight.

Roberti and colleagues conducted their study in 2018 after being asked by an Italian truck driver cooperative, Federtrasporti, to carry out a health survey of truck drivers. On 44 days between March and December, volunteer expert patients, doctors, and nurses questioned drivers at truck dealerships, 50 companies that were part of Federtrasporti, at driver training days and at a truck driver show.

They measured height, weight, and waist circumference, took details of medical conditions, such as diabetes, and of lifestyle factors, such as whether the drivers smoked or took drugs. They asked about their length of time as a haulier, distances covered, whether they drove national or international routes, and the types of goods they transported. Their questions about sleep included:

  • do you sometimes stop breathing and have sleep apnea at night?
  • do you snore?
  • do you wake up needing to urinate urgently?
  • are

Why Hire a Sleep Consultant?

With all of the free information available online, not to mention from friends and family members, what can a sleep consultant offer you that you can’t get yourself?

Truth be told, if a book or a website works to get your little one sleeping through the night, you might not need the personal attention and customized solutions that a consultant can offer. But if you’re struggling to get the sleep you and your baby need, they can make all the difference in the world. I’ll explain how in this week’s video.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,000 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Why Hire a Sleep Consultant? appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/why-hire-a-sleep-consultant/…

New and Upcoming Treatments for Narcolepsy 2019! Part II Update from World Sleep

Did you know the FDA has approved 27 novel drugs so far in 2019, and two of those are for narcolepsy?! How amazing is that?! The diversification of treatment approaches and new therapies under development and gaining FDA-approval for narcolepsy in the U.S. is SO EXCITING! In this post, I will provide an update on the narcolepsy drug development space and report back highlights from World Sleep 2019. This is Part II, Part I on hypocretin/orexin agonists is here.

Recent FDA Approvals:

Solriamfetol/Sunosi

  • Background: Solriamfetol (trade name Sunosi) is a wake-promoting agent, a dual-action dopamine and nonrepinephrine reuptake inhibitor to treat excessive daytime sleepiness in people with narcolepsy and obstructive sleep apnea. Clinical and preclinical data suggested that the wake-promoting effects of solriamfetol differ from medications such as modafinil and amphetamine.
  • Research Findings: Approval of Sunosi was based on data from clinical trials including:
    • One study evaluating excessive sleepiness in adult patients with narcolepsy (TONES 2)
    • Two studies evaluating excessive sleepiness in adult patients with OSA (TONES 3 and TONES 4),
    • An open-label long term safety and maintenance of efficacy for the treatment of excessive sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy or OSA (TONES 5).
  • FDA APPROVAL & Available Now: On March 20, 2019, Jazz Pharmaceuticals announced here that the FDA approved solriamfetol/Sunosi for the treatment of excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy or obstructive sleep apnea. As of July 2019, Sunosi is now commercially available for healthcare professionals and patients in the U.S. 

Pitolisant/Wakix

  • Background: Pitolisant is a histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist that activates histamine neurons, which is an exciting advancement because pitolisant works via a different mechanism of action than any other treatment options currently available for narcolepsy. This article offers some neat ideas about how the treatment may work. 
  • Pitolisant has been on the market in Europe since 2016 when approved by the European Medicines Agency. In Europe, pitolisant is known by its trade name “Wakix”. In October 2017, Harmony Biosciences, LLC acquired the rights to develop, register and market the drug in the United States.
  • Research Findings:
    • Phase 3 study results focused on

Orexin/Hypocretin Agonists are Coming! Part I: Reporting Back from World Sleep 2019

Room 116: A Glimpse of the Future

It was a basic, boring conference room, but there was nothing basic or boring about Room 116 at the Vancouver Convention Center on Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019 at 4:30 p.m. As the final session of the final of five days of the World Sleep Congress including World Narcolepsy Day, I felt wobbly and cataplectic, but I couldn’t go home, not yet.

At exactly 4:30 p.m., I eagerly stepped into Room 116 to join narcolepsy experts, drug developers and other patient advocates for a look into the future. 

This final session, simply titled “Narcolepsy” – included researchers sharing important new results related to novel and upcoming narcolepsy therapies. In July 2018, I reported here on the unprecedented amount of drug development underway for narcolepsy. Since then, the FDA has made three important approvals and more drug development continues on, full-steam ahead!

So it’s time for an update. Part I will catch you up to speed on orexin/hypocretin agonists, and Part II will share many more exciting developments. 

Dr. Todd Swick shares his excitement for new drugs to treat narcolepsy:

Watch this video on YouTube.

Advancing Orexin-Related Therapies

Since 1999, we’ve known that type 1 narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a selective loss of neurons producing the neuropeptide orexin (or hypocretin), which plays a central role in maintaining wakefulness. However, finding compounds able to cross the blood-brain barrier and mimic the function of orexin has been scientifically challenging. Over the past 20 years, a few approaches have been explored, but promising research started coming out of Japan a few years ago with Takeda Pharmaceuticals. 

So when Dr. Rebecca Evans took the stage in Room 116 to present Takeda’s first-in-human clinical trial findings for the orexin 2 receptor selective agonist, TAK-925, the excitement was palpable. I felt honored to be in the room as these outcomes were shared publicly for the first time here. 

TAK-925

  • Background: In 2017, a patent for orexin 2 receptor selective agonists, including the clinical candidate TAK-925 was claimed. In April 2018, the orexin 2 receptor-selective agonist, TAK-925, was

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review Issues Blog Post On Humidifiers And Snore RX For Snorers

The Snoring Mouthpiece Review has announced that they have published a new blog post on how humidifiers and snoring mouthpieces like SnoreRX can help snorers. The blog post is titled, “Humidifier: A Great Gift Even For A Snorer,” and explains why a humidifier can be a great gift idea for a friend or family member who snores. By introducing a moderate amount of moisture into the air, a humidifier can help the snorer relax and have a sound sleep that prevents snoring.

Steve Walker, author of the blog post, says, “A humidifier does more than just provide a spa-like ambiance to a room. It’s actually pretty useful to have a humidifier especially during the winter season.”

He adds, “It’s a practical gift because of the many uses of this particular electronic device. Aside from adding moisture in the air, the humidifier can also help relieve symptoms of different allergies, prevent dry skin, prevent babies from falling sick, and prevent snoring.”

According to the article, the moist air provided by the humidifier soothes the tissues at the back of the throat. The humidifier keeps the throat moist and this prevents irritation that is connected with snoring. Overall, humidifiers offer substantial benefits not only for the health of people but also for belongings and the atmosphere. When a humidifier is installed in the home, it not only helps strengthen the immune system, but it also decreases the incidence of nose bleeds by ensuring that the mucous membrane in the nose is moist.

Meanwhile, aside from the humidifiers, snoring can be prevented by snoring mouthpieces that have been well reviewed by The Snoring Mouthpiece Review. One example is the SnoreRX. The SnoreRX is FDA cleared and what makes it distinctive is the “MicroFit” feature. This allows the adjustment of the position of the lower jaw for maximize the person’s comfort and effectiveness.

However, the SnoreRX will have to be customized for each particular user through boil-and-bite technology. This means that it will have to be submerged in boiling water for approximately 18 seconds. The person who will use it will then clamp on …

Taking a “Sick Day” with Narcolepsy

When working in traditional offices, I struggled with “sick days.”

I didn’t often get colds or flus. I just dealt with my narcolepsy with cataplexy, which was fairly stable and “well-managed” by the time I took these jobs.

Yet narcolepsy was still with me every day, to varying degrees — from minor annoyance to extreme discomfort — sprinkled over moments, minutes or hours.

I rarely felt fully “healthy” OR fully “sick” — like bed-ridden, throwing up, or contagious — things deemed worthy of sick days. My more invisible and consistent adversity was hard to measure, hard to explain to a supervisor & hard to decide for myself when to say “Nope, not today.”

I eventually got better at this though and realized I didn’t need to explain myself. I could say “I’m not feeling well enough to work today,” and walk away to do some self-care. (Read here about getting a nap space.)

For the past 1.5 years, I’ve had my dream job working for Project Sleep. Now, I make my own schedule, work at my own pace and do NOT commute three hours a day across Los Angeles.

Interestingly, now that my work is my passion, taking a day off means putting off something I feel strongly about, or delaying something where I feel my “timeliness” reflects upon my leadership skills or my nonprofit’s consistency.

However, by the end of World Sleep, I was zombie-esque and feeling down. Which I realize sounds odd because I had TONS to be happy about after a successful inaugural World Narcolepsy DayWorld Sleep Congress 2019 in Vancouver, Canada. However, I was so depleted & indifferent on my route home on Thursday, I recognized that I needed another full day off.

Yesterday, I unpacked and made a big batch of minestrone soup. I bought three kinds of ice cream and four bunches of flowers and eucalyptus to fill my apartment. I watched YouTube aimlessly, walked lots and lay with my legs up the wall to bring down inflammation in my ankles.

Last night, I started doing my work in my …

Oventus Medical: The War on Snoring, Spousal Homicide and the Mouth Guard that Caught Alan Moss’ Eye

The Health Kick Podcast with Tim Boreham chats with Chris Hart, founder, managing director and CEO of Oventus Medical.

The company’s key focus is its range of medical devices that improve comfort during sleeping for patients suffering from various ailments including sleep apnoea and snoring, as well as secondary effects such as tooth decay and gum disease.

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/09/oventus-medical-the-war-on-snoring/…