Say Goodbye To Snoring With Oral Appliance Therapy

There’s a solution to your snoring problem. It’s called Oral Appliance Therapy. According to dentist, Dr. Micheal Uzelac, Oral Appliance Therapy works.

Uzelac, who had been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), had an oral appliance made to help reduce his disrupted breathing during sleep due to snoring. It worked.

“I slept soundly for three nights in a row, and I felt wonderful,” he said.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Oral Appliance Therapy may not be the common solution to snoring. Dr. Uzelac states that using a CPAP machine is the most common way to treat snoring. A CPAP machine can help reduce disrupted breathing during sleep.

“The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnea right now is the CPAP machine,” Uzelac said. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) involves wearing a mask or nasal cannula connected to a machine that delivers pressured air during sleep.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

CPAP machines may be popular but they’re not well-liked by snorers who are looking for a more comfortable and presentable way to solve their problem.

“The problem is, about 58% of people who are prescribed a CPAP machine don’t wear it,” Uzelac said. Some perceive the devices to be bulky, cumbersome, and uncomfortable.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

A better way to approach OSA and snoring is with the use of an oral appliance that could be custom-fitted to your mouth.

“With obstructive sleep apnea, the muscles in the throat relax and block breathing. Oral appliance therapy works like putting a door stop in a door,” Uzelac said. “The appliances help pull the jaw forward so the muscles can’t relax and block breathing.”

More than 100 oral appliances are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of OSA. They look like retainers or mouth guards, and simply fit over the upper and lower teeth.

(Via: https://www.valpolife.com/health/specialty/73600-oral-appliances-help-reduce-or-eliminate-snoring)

Take note that oral appliance therapy is best for folks who aren’t suffering from severe apnea. Here’s what Dr. Uzelac has to say about it.

Uzelac said those who tend to respond best to oral appliance therapy are those with less severe apnea, women ages

Breakthrough Study Reveals Cure for Snoring

There’s a cure and it’s being kept quiet…

Every night, in homes across the country, bedrooms reverberate with the trumpeting, whistling, whining and grunting of the nation’s snorers.

It’s a deafening cacophony that blights an estimated 60 percent of the population — and their long-suffering partners — and fuels a lucrative and ever-growing trade in snore-busting gadgets and remedies.

But as anyone who’s tried the throat sprays, nasal dilators, jaw slings, magic pillows or mouth splints that claim to ease snoring will know, snoring is infuriatingly difficult to fix.

It is just one more insulting consequence of the aging process, and therefore extremely common. But despite that, few people appreciate quite how debilitating it can be to your health and your relationships.

The snorer might sound as if they are blissfully sleeping, but their body will be struggling to get air in and out through slack and floppy airways and this extra effort will ultimately compromise the quality of the deeply restorative phases of sleep.

This is the time when the vitally important mental and physical repair process is supposed to happen, and the heart should be able to slow and rest.

Although snoring is more likely to occur if you are overweight, it can also trap you in a vicious cycle whereby the snoring itself triggers weight gain. Studies show poor sleep typically stimulates the appetite for sweet and fatty foods as your body fights to cope with fatigue.

As long-term snoring causes protracted sleep deprivation, which in turn means your snoring worsens, the weight piles on. This then increases your risk of obesity-related disorders such as diabetes, heart disease, even some cancers.

Snoring is a potent trigger for bitterness, ridicule, and resentment in relationships and studies show that for around 6 percent of couples, bad snoring can be enough to trigger marriage breakdown.

Inveterate snorers, and therefore their bed partners, rarely get close to achieving even the lower recommended target of six hours of restful sleep each night. Studies show the partner of a snorer loses 90 minutes of sleep most nights and so gradually builds a sleep …

Snoring: When Should You Worry About It?

Snorers are often the butt of jokes. We make fun of them but in reality, they’re not funny at all. As a matter of fact, they probably need more of our help than our usual sarcasm about their snoring. For all we know, the snoring could be a sign of something more serious.

No matter how you define it, snoring is a common habit for both men and women. It’s typically most common for men, but for any person, your chances of snoring start to increase as you get older. Although this problem is usually just mildly annoying (or funny), there are times when snoring can be related to a serious condition called sleep apnea.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

While snorers may look and sound funny while sleeping, they’re actually struggling to catch some air.

WebMD says that people snore when there’s a physical obstruction interrupting the flow of air through the mouth and nose.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

The causes of physical obstruction are the following:

1. Blocked nasal passages – Mucous or physical growths or changes in your nasal cavity can change the flow of air through your system.
2. Bulky throat tissue – If you’re slightly overweight or if you have large tonsils, you’re more likely to snore.
3. Poor muscle tone – If the muscles in your throat or tongue are too relaxed, they can collapse and get in the way as air is passing through. As you get older, these muscles start to relax more.
4. Long soft plate and/or uvula – This tissue can narrow the opening from your nose to your throat. It dangles in the back of your mouth and, when they bump against each other, it can block your airway, which causes snoring.

(Via: https://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/here-when-you-should-worry-about-your-snoring/QOtVsZCyycYpD8qa07MPSP/)

While it’s natural for everyone to snore, we really shouldn’t make fun of a snore that is unusually loud. An unusually loud snore is something we should really worry about.

If your snoring is louder than normal, you wake up feeling tired and your breathing stops and starts throughout the night, it’s possible you might have

More Than 936 Million Have Obstructive Sleep Apnea Worldwide

More than 936 million people have obstructive sleep apnea—the disorder’s first prevalence update in more than a decade—according to The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

The Lancet published a multinational analysis by ResMed and 12 sleep researchers. The results were first presented at the American Thoracic Society 2018 International Conference in San Diego.

This figure is nearly 10 times greater than the World Health Organization’s 2007 estimate of more than 100 million, renewing calls for physicians to step up their efforts to screen, diagnose, and prescribe treatment for those who unknowingly have the disorder.

“More than 85% of sleep apnea patients are undiagnosed, meaning hundreds of millions repeatedly suffocate instead of getting healthy, restful sleep each night,” says Carlos M. Nunez, MD, a study coauthor and ResMed’s chief medical officer, in a release. “This raises their risk of workplace and roadway accidents, and can contribute to other significant health problems, such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, or even poor glucose control for diabetic patients. We know the risks, and now we know the size of the problem is nearly 10 times greater than previously thought. Addressing it starts with screening patients we know to be high-risk.”

Why Is Sleep Apnea Mostly Undiagnosed?

“Many will attribute the resulting tiredness to aging or stress,” says Nunez. “Others will mention the problem to their doctor, only to be misdiagnosed with insomnia, migraines, chronic fatigue, or other conditions. Misdiagnosis is especially common with women, since sleep apnea was long thought to be much more common in men.”

Today, women account for 40% of newly diagnosed sleep apnea patients.

Another reason may be undiagnosed can be blamed on cultural ideas of what constitutes good sleep.

“For instance, some believe snoring may simply be a normal feature of how some people sleep, when in fact it’s one of the most important signs for the risk of having sleep apnea,” Nunez says. “With a global prevalence that approaches 1 billion people, patients and physicians need to consider the risks and ask the questions that may ultimately help them sleep and live better. This is no longer a problem that

Creating the Perfect Sleep Environment

When it comes to decorating baby’s nursery, we tend to pay a lot of attention to the visual appeal and not think so much about the practicality. Mobiles, night lights, star projectors, and faux aquariums may look nice to us, but they might be standing in the way of a good night’s sleep.

In today’s video, I’ve got some practical tips to help you create an ideal environment to help your baby get to sleep and stay asleep, and do it on a razor-thin budget!

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Creating the Perfect Sleep Environment appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/creating-the-perfect-sleep-environment/…

Can This Smart Strap Actually Stop Snoring?

Snoring is such a big deal nowadays. Well, it should be. Considering the high percentage of habitual snorers these days, it’s high time we take snoring seriously.

According to research, 40-percent of adult men and 24-percent of adult women snore habitually. It’s cited as a key issue in preventing people from getting a solid night’s rest, either because they themselves are snoring, or the person next to them are.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

Snoring not just affects the snorer. It also affects other people who are bothered by the loud noise. It’s hard to sleep with someone who snores. No one gets quality sleep with a snorer around. That pretty much contributes to the reason why snoring is such a big deal these days.

It all sounds faintly ridiculous, but snoring is a big deal – both in terms of annual relief spending, and for potential long term health implications. Snoring can be a strong risk factor for hypertension, for instance, while if left untreated it can eventually lead to Obstructive Sleep Apnoea, or OSA. That’s where the walls of the throat narrow during sleep, making it harder to breathe.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

OSA is a serious disease. It can lead to other health issues that could be deadly at some point.

Over time, OSA can lead to an increased risk of stroke or heart attack, to atrial fibrillation, and even make it more likely that you’ll develop type 2 diabetes.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

That explains why there is an urgent need to stop snoring.

Stopping snoring isn’t going to instantly prevent all that from happening, but it’s a good first step, and doctors typically look at snoring as an early symptom that there’s something going wrong when you’re in bed.

(Via: https://www.slashgear.com/philips-sleepsmart-snoring-relief-band-health-implications-sleep-apnoea-26574840/)

The question is, can a smart strap like the Phillips’ Smart Snoring Relief Band actually stop snoring? Before we answer that, let’s take a close look at it first.

The latest addition to the company’s sleep-focused range, the Philips SleepSmart Snoring Relief Band replaces giving your bedmate a swift kick when they’re making too much noise.

Demystifying Intraoral Scanning in Dental Sleep Medicine

A Diplomate shows dentists the ins and outs of accurate digital impressions for sleep appliances.

Intraoral dental scanners provide dentists with a tool that can digitally capture the images of teeth and surrounding soft tissue with astonishing accuracy. The clinician simply waves a rather expensive wand over the teeth and a rotatable image instantly appears on the screen. This new technology can represent an opportunity to replace old methods with one that is faster and more comfortable for the patient. But the unknowns of scanning can be intimidating, as is the case for many dentists whose training and experience have always focused on physical impressions and plaster models. Although the presence of scanners in dentistry is becoming increasingly more common, it is estimated that less than 25% of dental offices own a scanner, and those that do tend to be larger multi-dentist practices.1

How do a scanner handpiece and a computer produce a printable 3D image? As Yale University professor of biomedical engineering James Duncan, PhD, a pioneer in 3D image technology, explains, scanners “gather information about the shape and size of dental structure or arches as well as the position of implants by first projecting structured light (basically a light grid pattern) or a laser beam onto a tooth’s surface and then recording how the pattern or the beam is changed or distorted when it hits the surface using very high resolution cameras. Then software is used to reconstruct or form a full 3D model of the structure by fitting a polygonal mesh to a large set of points that cover the tooth or teeth being studied.”

In dentistry, increased accuracy means fewer remakes and reduced chair time for insertion adjustments. Recent tests on in-vitro models have shown scanners to have accuracies (trueness) in the range of 50 micrometers (ranging from 20 to about 100 micrometers).2,3 David Walton, CEO and founder of sleep apnea therapy company Respire Medical (acquired by Whole You), welcomes scans for oral appliances. “Due to the accuracy of digital scans, not

When Snoring Becomes Deadly

We know that snoring kills. If it isn’t addressed and treated, it can lead to a lot of health complications that can eventually kill the snorer.

However, we don’t really hear a lot of stories on snorers being murdered for the obvious and annoying reason that they snore. Hopefully, there aren’t a lot of stories on it but unfortunately, there’s one that came out on May 1.

A woman at a UK hospital died two weeks after a hotheaded patient whacked her in the head because she was annoyed by her snoring, a report said.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Now, that is one sad news. Needless to say, it’s a senseless murder. How could anyone kill anyone and for what? For snoring? It’s totally absurd but it’s true. It happened.

Mom of five Eileen Bunting, 64, was attacked and hit in the head with a cup while she was in a hospital bed at the Hull Royal Infirmary in Hull, England, on March 22, The Sun reported.

Bunting, who was left with a bloody gash on her forehead, was slated to be released from the hospital the day after the attack, but after she was assaulted, her health quickly declined.

She died April 4, according to the news outlet.

(Via: https://nypost.com/2019/05/01/woman-dies-in-hospital-after-patient-attacks-her-for-snoring/)

Apparently, Bunting’s snoring had become a serious issue for one patient who just couldn’t take it anymore. The sad part is that the attack seemed like it was well-laid out.

The victim’s son told local media that he believed the assault was a “premeditated” attack after it was discovered that the unidentified patient who went after his mother had tied the hospital room’s door handles together to prevent anyone from coming inside.

“The nurses must have been doing the rounds, noticed the doors were shut and found my mom full of blood and her stood over her with a cup,” Bunting’s son, Mark Bunting, told Hull Live, according to the report.
“The doors had been pulled to and tied together with a blanket and then she proceeded to attack my mom. It was premeditated,” the devastated son said.

(Via: …

Baby Wakes Up When I Put Her In the Crib

How many times have you been through this situation? You rock your baby to sleep in your arms until she’s out like a light, and then the moment you put her into her crib, her eyes pop open and she won’t go back to sleep no matter what you do.

I honestly don’t think I’ve ever met a parent who hasn’t experienced this, and it’s just as confusing for each and every one of them. Why on earth would a peacefully sleeping baby wake up the minute they get put into their bed?

Well, I’m happy to tell you that there’s actually a pretty logical explanation, as well as an easy way to solve the problem. I’ll share both with you in this week’s video!

Rather read than watch? Click here.

If your baby, infant or toddler is having trouble sleeping through the night, help is just a click away! The Sleep Sense Program has helped over 57,00 parents to get their kids sleeping 11-12 hours through the night AND taking long, restful naps during the day. If you’re ready to get started today – I’m looking forward to helping you!

The post Baby Wakes Up When I Put Her In the Crib appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/baby-wakes-up-when-i-put-her-in-the-crib/…

Toward a Better Understanding of Sleep Surgery

The international sleep medicine community gathered in New York City to discuss hypoglossal neurostimulation therapy, personalized treatment of sleep apnea, snoring and much more.

Picture an international gathering of expert sleep apnea surgeons, sleep medicine specialists, and dental sleep medicine practitioners and you have the 10th International Surgical Sleep Society meeting that took place in New York City from May 9-11, 2019. About 400 attendees from 36 countries met to discuss the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), updates on current treatments, and future directions for OSA treatment. About 100 speakers from around the world participated in presentations and lively discussions.

“The concept of the meeting was to provide highly concise, high level presentations on advanced OSA topics and to stimulate open, intellectual, collegial exchange in and out of the sessions,” says Ofer Jacobowitz, MD, PhD, co-director of sleep at ENT and Allergy Associates, NY, who chaired the meeting with Maria Suurna, MD, from Weill Cornell Medicine, NY. The format allowed for question and answer sessions to encourage interaction of attendees with international sleep surgery experts.

Immediately prior to the main meeting, a special research forum entitled “Maximizing success of implantable hypoglossal neurostimulation therapy” was held at Steelcase in New York City. The option of hypoglossal neurostimulation (HGNS) is an addition to the treatment array for CPAP-intolerant patients and fosters collaboration between sleep medicine and surgery specialists. International experts discussed a variety of HGNS topics such as: which measures of OSA disease burden should be used to define success, patient features that may predict apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) reduction, technical aspects of implantation and stimulation, and possible sequential or concurrent treatments to optimize success. Currently body mass index, AHI, and sleep endoscopy are used to select patients for HGNS, but meeting presenters said that more precise criteria are needed.

Experts said it appears that women may be more likely to have success with HGNS. In contrast, those whose OSA has a significant psychophysiological insomnia component may not tolerate stimulation well and thus perhaps should be screened out. Optimization of outcome was an important topic, including combination therapy of HGNS with upper