Celebrating 10 years of the REM Runner Blog!

10 years ago today, I came out as a person with narcolepsy. On November 10, 2009, I started this REM Runner blog, disclosing on the internet for the first time that: “I’m Julie Flygare, a person living with narcolepsy with cataplexy.” 

From my original About Me: 

“Narcolepsy has changed my life for better and worse. I am proud to be a person with narcolepsy, yet I hope to build a brighter future for this serious chronic illness… On this blog, I will share some of my experiences as a person with narcolepsy, and as a runner, yogi, and photographer. In doing so, I hope to shed some light on narcolepsy, a little known and often misunderstood condition.”

Feels like yesterday? Nope.

I wish I could say “it feels like yesterday,” but honestly, it feels like a lifetime ago. My drive and mission remains the same, but this past decade has been a tremendous period of growth for me, the lowest of lows and highest of highs. Some of the lows I’ve shared here, like losing my dad and the nutty rollercoaster of publishing my book, others I’ve kept private.

At the same time, I ran three marathons, published Wide Awake and Dreaming: A Memoir of Narcolepsy, created the Narcolepsy: Not Alone campaign, founded Project Sleep, moved across the country, co-founded the Jack & Julie Narcolepsy Scholarship, worked full-time in the cancer non-profit space, fell in-love with speaking, and eventually took on my dream job of running Project Sleep

My blog is OLDER than Instagram.

When I started this blog, it was an important platform for me to share candid stories about living with type 1 narcolepsy with cataplexy. At the time, blogs were fairly new and Instagram didn’t even exist (IG launched the following year, on Oct. 6, 2010).

Today, I don’t publish here as much as I’d like. I have dozens of half-written posts and ideas listed in notebooks. When I prioritize my time so carefully, blogging often gets cut. At some point, I started to over-think each post. Meanwhile, Instagram snuck into my …

How To Address Snoring Naturally

You will snore at some point in your life. That is a fact. Will it imply that something is wrong? Yes, it can. Can something be done to address it? Yes to that as well.

 

Snoring happens when your air has a hard time getting through your air passages. The air vibrates within the walls of the throat and produces a sound that we know as a snore. Snoring is more common in middle to older aged people. The loud kind of snore, that is. Snoring can be both a symptom of a condition or a cause to it. This is why knowing your health condition, medical condition, sleeping practices, and the way you snore can help determine how to address your snoring problems.

 

If your snoring isn’t caused by a medical condition, then you can opt for a treatment that won’t necessarily require medical attention. But if you are in doubt, it’s best to consult your physician. Here are some natural measures you can do about your snoring.

 

Drop the excess weight.

People who are overweight are two times more likely to snore than those who aren’t. The reason is simple, overweight people carry extra fat around their necks which narrows their airways and causes them to snore. So lose a couple of pounds and lose your noisy nighttime companion. Switching up your diet, getting some exercise and ironically enough sleep will help you lose weight.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Switch to other sleeping positions.

Sleeping on your back can cause your airways to become blocked or narrowed. If you notice that you snore while sleeping on your back it is time to switch up your sleeping position. Sleeping on your side is usually recommended. Old habits die hard so the odds are that as you drift deeper into sleep you’d roll unto your back again. The fix? Invest in a body pillow. A body pillow will help you maintain sleeping on your side. Another mean old trick is sewing tennis balls unto the back of your pajamas.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/snoring/10-natural-snoring-remedies/)

 

Reduce alcohol consumption and …

Listen Now: Social Experience of Narcolepsy on Sleep Junkies Podcast

“I remember keeping [my narcolepsy] private and always feeling like it was this thing sitting at the back of my throat that I wanted to share, but just stopping myself, remembering ‘you’ll get a bad reaction, this person won’t understand.’”   – Julie Flygare, Sleep Junkies podcast

 “So you went from something being a secret to the outside world, and then you kind of switched on the turbo, started a blog, wrote your book, and then to Project Sleep… From one extreme to the other and there seems to be no stopping what you’re doing.”    – Jeff Mann, Sleep Junkies

I was honored to be interviewed recently for the Sleep Junkies podcast – listen here! Please share this with friends to inform your community on what it’s REALLY like to live with narcolepsy. The psychosocial impact, stigma and undue jokes are a huge part of living with narcolepsy, yet under-discussed.

033: Narcolepsy: the social experience – Julie Flygare

Thank you, Sleep Junkies and Jeff Mann for inviting me to share my experience and Project Sleep’s efforts to build a brighter future. I’ve enjoyed getting to know Jeff over the past year, he published this neat article about my efforts last year. 

from Julie Flygare http://julieflygare.com/listen-now-social-experience-of-narcolepsy-on-sleep-junkies-podcast/…

How to Deal With Your Child Throwing Food

Unless you’re exceptionally lucky, your toddler is inevitably going to play with their food. That often includes picking it up, dumping it over their heads, or throwing it on the floor. It’s an irritating habit that any parent would like to avoid, but this might be one of those scenarios where your best bet is to do nothing at all. I’ll explain why in this week’s video.

Are you concerned about your young child’s eating habits? Dreading the inevitable battle at mealtimes? Tired of negotiating with your child to get them to eat healthy, nutritious foods? The Food Sense Program has quick, easy steps that you can take starting right now to fix your child’s eating habits and help them develop a healthy relationship with food that will last a lifetime!

Want PROOF that my fast and simple suggestions really work? I thought you might… so I’ve put together a FREE resource for you! Not only will you get a sneak peak at how my methods work, you’ll also get a step-by-step plan for dealing with one of the most common food challenges parents face!

Because on this site, you’ll find answers to some of your biggest headaches, including how to:

  • Eliminate food battles with your toddler — almost instantly.
  • Stop ‘mealtime negotiations’ at the table, like “If you eat 3 more bites, you can have ice cream…”
  • End your child’s constant begging for treats and snacks in between meals.

 

The post How to Deal With Your Child Throwing Food appeared first on The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman.

from Blog – The Sleep Sense Program by Dana Obleman https://sleepsense.net/deal-child-throwing-food/…

Most Prevalent Sleep Disturbances

All of us need good quality and quantity of sleep. But unfortunately, not every one of us can get it. Society today compels us to work harder than we did yesterday. More time is spent on working than resting.  Sleep can sometimes be a luxury for some. But the truth of the matter is that we need as much sleep as we can get. Getting the enough number of hours of sleep is crucial and it should be of good quality. As in, you are having a deep sleep and not spending more time tossing and turning or waking up in the middle of the night.

 

Some people can easily fall asleep. Some others find it a chore. Some have a sound sleep while others don’t. Sleeping isn’t the same for everyone no matter how much we need it or get it. Sleeping can be inconvenient for others especially for those who have medical conditions. Here are some of the most common sleep disturbances.

 

Snoring. Snoring happens when your air passages get narrow.

About half of all people in the world snore at some point in their lives. More common in men, over 40 percent of adult men and 24 percent of adult women are habitual snorers. In more detail, snoring is the sound that comes from obstructed air movement in your throat when you breathe while sleeping. 

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is also known as a stop in breathing while sleeping.

Sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder. People who go untreated stop breathing repeatedly during sleep. This can lead to the brain and the rest of the body not getting enough oxygen. Which in turn can lead to stroke, heart failure, diabetes, depression, and headaches.

(Via:https://www.sleepcycle.com/sleep-disorders/the-most-common-sleep-disorders/)

 

Insomnia. Sounds familiar? Like snoring, one probably has or will encounter this in their life.

Ever had trouble falling asleep? Or do you find yourself waking up in the middle of the night, unable to fall back to sleep? Is this something you experience more than three days a week? If so,

Get Yourself A Better Sleep By Following These Tips

Life is busy. Could it get any busier? Yes. But can you have enough sleep every day? Yes as well.  Today’s active and bustling society may not rest, but you can. In fact, getting enough and good quality sleep has to be given more emphasis these days since getting busy is starting to be a norm.

 

Sleep is just as important as good nutrition and exercise. One can never truly call himself or herself healthy without any one of these three. Sleeping can actually lead to a healthy life. If you are having a hard time falling asleep or getting a good sleep, these tips will help you out.

 

Shut off the noise.

You may not recall the racket caused by yesterday’s midnight garbage pickup, but your body probably does. Even if you don’t wake up, noise can disrupt your slumber and cause restlessness, increased heart rate and blood pressure, and changes in breathing patterns…

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525773#525773)

 

Have some aromatherapy.

Creating a bedtime ritual that includes diffusing (a process of dispersing) essential oils 30 minutes before sacking out is a simple and effective way to cue the body to rest, says Sara Panton, essential-oil expert and cofounder of Vitruvi. Not only are there certain scents that encourage drowsiness, but the very act of setting up a routine helps signal to your brain that it’s time to start shutting off.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525767#525767)

 

Be cool. Literally.

Body temperature regularly fluctuates throughout the day—it’s usually at its highest in the afternoon and lowest in the early a.m. So if your room is hot, your body will work all night to cool down—and if you’re sweating, you’re more likely to wake up. The sweet spot: 65 degrees, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/advice-for-better-sleep?slide=525770#525770)

 

Give your space a room to breathe. Exercise caution though. You might not want to open your windows for too long especially if there are insects and creepy crawlies that want to join you inside.

Room stuffiness can hike nasal congestion and hinder your ability to breathe while you doze. Per

Picking Your Battles

As Kenny Rogers so famously put it, “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em and know when to fold ’em,” and that’s never so true as it is when you’re dealing with a young child. If you were to stand firm every time you and your little one disagreed, you would spend almost all of your time arguing. And even though the hills worth defending will be different for every family, I’ve got some suggestions today to help you evaluate where you might want to give up some ground in exchange for a little peace and serenity.

Rather read than watch? Click here.

I’m A CPAP Dropout: Why Many Lose Sleep Over Apnea Treatment

When doctors told Frances Faulkenburg she had sleep apnea, she was more than ready for relief from her tired-all-the-time existence. She used to fall asleep at red lights while behind the wheel. At night, she’d wake up gasping for air, heart pounding. Her husband told her she snored.

But Faulkenburg, 47, couldn’t tolerate the CPAP machine her doctor prescribed.

“I just could not get used to the face mask covering both my nose and mouth,” said Faulkenburg, who lives in Oviedo, Fla.

“It was claustrophobic.”

CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure, is often one of the first solutions doctors suggest for sleep apnea. With this disorder, a person’s breathing stops and starts so frequently during the night that it can lead to or exacerbate health problems. The National Sleep Foundation estimates that more than 18 million American adults have sleep apnea.

A CPAP machine blows a stream of air into the back of the throat to let people breathe easier. It prevents muscles in the back of the throat from narrowing, which can constrict the airway, causing snoring or disturbed sleep.

Yet Faulkenburg quit using her CPAP and went back to feeling sleepy and tired all the time.

Many people have a negative reaction to the machines and are tempted to do the same. The big whoosh of air in your throat. The restrictive mask on your face. It can be a lot to adjust to. Studies suggest that from one-third to more than 50% of patients either stop using their CPAP machine or never bother to fill their prescription. They quit for a variety of reasons, but mostly because the device can be cumbersome and uncomfortable. Sometimes, they quit because of confusing or stringent health insurance restrictions.

But the health effects of untreated sleep apnea can be serious. People struggle with anxiety, tiredness and low productivity. There’s even an increased risk of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.

Mary Mertens, a respiratory therapist at the Cleveland Clinic, helps patients work through problems with their CPAP machine. Patients often complain that the volume

Reasons Why Being A Night Person Is Not Good For Your Health

Many things can keep us up at night. It can be work that you took home as an assignment because your boss insists on having it done by morning. It can also be insomnia or a medical condition like anxiety. It can also be that you are doing a movie marathon on Netflix. Or maybe, you just like to be up at night and not during daylight. Whichever it is, it’s nowhere near good. This is so because studies have shown that the relationship with improper sleep-wake cycle and health issues are direct.

 

You’ll be at risk for higher blood pressure. You don’t have it in the family. You eat healthy meals. Therefore don’t let being a night owl break the chain.

In a 2013 study in the journal Chronobiology International, researchers found that “evening types” were  than “morning types” to have , even after they controlled for participants’ total amount of sleep and sleep quality.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513065#513065)

 

You’ll have less time for exercise. Sleep is important. So is exercise. Don’t lose both.

Self-described night owls  than people who consider themselves early birds, according to a 2014 research abstract in the journal Sleep; they also report having more difficulty finding time to exercise and maintaining a regular exercise schedule.

(Via: https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513071#513071)

 

You’re more likely to gain weight. Unless you want that, then this probably won’t be a problem.

Some experts believe that  disrupts the body’s natural overnight fasting period, which can interfere with its ability to burn fat. Night owls also happen to  per day than early birds, according to a 2011 study in the journal Obesity–248 more, on average–perhaps because willpower is lower when you’re tired and we  late at night.

(Via:https://www.health.com/sleep/health-risks-night-owl?slide=513077#513077)

 

You’re more at risk for diabetes type 2.

In one 2015 study, published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, men with evening chronotypes were more likely to have  (a condition in which the body loses muscle mass), compared to men with morning chronotypes.

Female night owls, compared with their early bird counterparts, tended to have more belly

New TV Show Is Looking for Britain’s Loudest Snorers Whose Long-suffering Partners Have Had Enough

The Sun reports that an ad for the unnamed show—which is being produced by Firecracker Films—read: “Is your partner’s snoring ruining your life?”

“Firecracker Films is making an exciting new show for a major terrestrial broadcaster and we’re looking for some of Britain’s biggest and loudest snorers.

“We want to hear from fed-up partners who’ve simply had enough.”

from Sleep Review http://www.sleepreviewmag.com/2019/10/new-tv-show-is-looking-for-britains-loudest-snorers-whose-long-suffering-partners-have-had-enough/…